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Film agency FILM Suffolk is looking for crowdfunding to put new ghost film up on the big screen in time for Halloween.

Theatre has the ability to tackle some big questions in a fun and entertaining manner. Arts Editor Andrew Clarke spoke to director Amit Lahav about his new show The Wedding which asks questions about society and how we live.

With blockbusters clammering for our attention at every turn it’s easy for some of the smaller, more thoughtful films to slip passed, unnoticed. Arts editor Andrew Clarke presents a series of idiosyncratic suggestions for movies, both old and new, that may entertain if you are in the mood for something different.

In three years the Ink Festival has established itself as a vital platform for new theatrical writing talent. Arts editor Andrew Clarke spoke to artistic directors Julia Sowerbutts and Emma Struthers to find out how the festival has developed

West End star Kerry Ellis has teamed up with long time collaborator Brian May to produce their third album Golden Days. Arts editor Andrew Clarke takes a listen

Living legend Pat Church lives and breathes cinema and has done for more than 50 years. He started his professional life in a projection box in Peterborough, relishing the feel of 35mm film running through his fingers.

Well travelled East Anglian artist Mike Ferrell is packing his bags, gathering his brushes, and, in just six weeks, will be saying farewell to this green and pleasant land, swapping Suffolk for the mountains of Spain. But, before he goes, he’s leaving us with an exhibition of paintings which explode with colour and movement.

With blockbusters clammering for our attention at every turn it’s easy for some of the smaller, more thoughtful films to slip passed, unnoticed. Arts editor Andrew Clarke presents a series of idiosyncratic suggestions for movies, both old and new, that may entertain if you are in the mood for something different.

One of the great conductors is spending Easter at the Snape Maltings and will be seeking to engage audiences, both young and old, with an eclectic programme that includes Britten’s Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra. Arts Editor Andrew Clarke spoke to Marin Alsop about the thrill of working in Britten’s concert hall.

Pete Townshend’s classic rock opera Tommy is one of the great cultural treasures of our time. It started life as a double-album released by The Who in 1969. It was the first time that rock music had attempted to tell a complex story through song.

With blockbusters clammering for our attention at every turn it’s easy for some of the smaller, more thoughtful films to slip past, unnoticed. Arts editor Andrew Clarke presents a new series of idiosyncratic suggestions for movies, both old and new, that may entertain if you are in the mood for something different.

Noel Coward and Gertrude Lawrence were two of the biggest stars in Britain. Arts editor Andrew Clarke speaks to the team bringing their artistic love affair back on stage

Director Kerry Michael has unveiled an outstanding spectacle of a show which brilliantly displays the continued quality and the ambition of what the New Wolsey has to offer.

Call me old fashioned but there are certain things which you just should not do and one of them is give the audience to determine the ending of any book, play, film or TV drama.

We live in a visual age. Films and TV series bombard us from all sides but with so many high profile blockbusters clammering for our attention, it’s easy for some of the smaller, more thoughtful films to slip past, unnoticed. Arts editor Andrew Clarke presents a new series of idiosynctaic suggestions for movies, both old and new, that may entertain if you are in the mood for something different.

The regional premiere of an Ealing Comedy classic and the revival of a much-loved New Wolsey musical form the cornerstone of the Ipswich theatre’s autumn season – along with a brand new rock’n’roll pantomime.

Do you fancy dancing with the devil at midnight under a clear moonlit sky? If the answer is ‘no’ then you may be missing out on a fabulously entertaining night at the theatre.

Southwold artist Karen SJ Keable is someone who has a life-long love affair with the sea. Her latest exhibition I Dream of the Sea is her first in more than two years and marks her 15th anniversary as a professional artist.

Eastern Angles know a thing or two about folk tales – particularly Eastern Anglian folk tales – but this year’s spring tour offers us something a little more exotic – not only a trip to the Scottish borders but to a place where time plays strange games with your senses.

A rare collection of Constable drawings, prints and paintings from the artists family has gone on long term loan to Gainsborough’s House and can be seen alongside work by Constable’s own inspiration Thomas Gainsborough.

East Anglian pop icon Matt Cardle talks to Arts editor Andrew Clarke about added dates for his summer concert, his new album and the importance of musical independence

There is something inherently funny about watching children and adults struggling to remove or put on their shoes and socks.

Rock legend and The Who’s guitarist and lead songwriter Pete Townshend is so impressed and enthused by The New Wolsey Theatre’s production of his rock opera Tommy that he has penned two new songs to be included in the show.

East Anglian art icon Maggi Hambling is famed for her sea paintings which capture the tumultuous moment when the rolling waves of the North Sea rise up and crash against our ancient coastline.

For West End star Kerry Ellis the past six months have been something of a blur. For the last six months of 2016 she starred in the London premiere of the off-Broadway musical Murder Ballad before going straight into rehearsals for an eight month UK tour of Wonderland, a new take on Lewis Carroll’s tales of Alice and her adventures down the rabbit hole.

The evening may have been billed as Ruthie Henshall and her Band but what we got was a brilliant guided tour through some of the finest moments of modern theatre, courtesy of Ruthie and her special guests Kerry Ellis and Tom Barber, along with Ian Ashpitel and Jonty Stephens.

Do you remember where you were on May 6 1978? Were you singing your heart out on the terraces of Wembley Stadium as Ipswich Town subdued The Gunners, defied the pundits and added the FA Cup to its trophy cabinet?

West End star Ruthie Henshall admits that when she is in a show, it is all consuming. Last year she completed a gruelling 18 months playing Mrs Wilkinson in Billy Elliot – a role she doubled with being a real-life mother to her two girls Lily and Dolly.

Your wedding day is supposed to be the happiest day of your life – but it can also be a familia nightmare as brooding resentments bubble to the surface as your nearest and dearest all flock to your side to make sure that this special day will never be forgotten.

It’s fast, impeccably played, gloriously improbable and very, very funny. Director Nicky Henson’s production of John Cleese’s slick updating of a French classic is an object lesson in how to play farce.

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