Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 16°C

min temp: 15°C

Search

Ipswich: Mother-of-two Jo Salter launches ethical clothing range

PUBLISHED: 09:09 26 June 2014 | UPDATED: 11:55 26 June 2014

Jo Salter with some of her Where Does It Come From? products

Jo Salter with some of her Where Does It Come From? products

Archant

Ipswich mum Jo Salter wants to change the world so she has started in her own small way with her own “moral” clothes label.

In the same way that modern shoppers demand traceability for food, and other products, Jo believes we can do the same for our clothes.

She has launched her own ethical clothes label – Where Does It Come From? sourcing clothes direct from garment workers in co-operatives working in Gujarat, India.

So customers can not only know they are from a `Fair Trade’ source, where local workers are properly rewarded, but can actually trace their garment back to the individual people, and see their stories via the website.

Jo, the mother of sons Luke, nine, and William, six, has launched the first group of products online, a denim collection of clothes for children. Her two sons have been pressed into action as fashion models for jeans and other items.

“It has taken two years to get to here,” she explained.

“It is early days yet. I have started with children’s clothing because there seems to be a demand from friends and other parents for attractive and practical clothes for their children. I will probably next move on to jeans for adults.

“The children’s jeans are in three colours and quite unusual.”

Other popular items included a denim dress and practical culottes for girls.

Jo was inspired to set up her own business to fill a gap in the market place. She was fed up with fashion being linked to sweat shops, pesticides, chemicals and the way clothes are quickly discarded and after years of research and negotiating, has now launched her own label ‘Where Does It Come From?’

Customers can trace where they were manufactured and where the material for their clothes come from, including where the plants were grown.

“The cotton industry is rife with pesticides, forced labour etc. and most customers demand cheaper and cheaper clothes,’ said Jo.

‘Fast fashion, where garments are produced in about in four weeks, has contributed to the challenges faced by garment producers. We all know about the Rana Plaza factory collapse and the effects of chemicals and pesticides on people and the environment.

‘I’m hoping to inspire people to have more of a relationship with their clothes – just as when you grow a carrot in your garden it seems more tasty, I’m hoping that people will feel more for their clothes when they know how they were made and who made them.’

The clothes are ethically produced by artisans whose skills are passed from generation to generation – skills such as hand dying, weaving and block printing.

Jo added: “It is good to know people who make the clothes are directly rewarded.”

Visit www.wheredoesitcomefrom.co.uk for more information.

Search hundreds of local jobs at Jobs24

Major exporting success is a step closer for East of England firms which have benefited from a multi-million pound government funding pot to help businesses gain an international foothold.

The senior team at award-winning Suffolk rooflight company, Sunsquare, showed Bury St Edmunds MP Jo Churchill around their factory last week.

Drinks group Konings has unveiled plans to expand capacity at the Copella fruit juice site near Sudbury, potentially creating more than 100 new jobs.

A total of 31 care providers have been selected as finalists for this year’s Suffolk Care Awards.

Tourists jetting to the UK “in their droves” to take advantage of the weak pound could spend up to £2.4bn on our high streets this summer.

Management Jobs

Show Job Lists

Most read

Topic pages

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter
MyDate24 MyPhotos24