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Poll: HMV calls in administrators

09:44 15 January 2013

The HMV store on Oxford Street, central London

The HMV store on Oxford Street, central London

Ailing music chain HMV has lost its battle for survival in a devastating blow for the British high street and more than 4,000 staff.

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The appointment of Deloitte as administrator to the 92-year-old business comes after the failures of Jessops and Comet caused the closure of 422 stores and loss of more than 8,000 jobs.

HMV’s 238 outlets will remain open while Deloitte attempts to find a buyer for some or all of the business, although it is likely that there will be widespread store closures as a result of the collapse.

HMV has more than a dozen stores around the eastern region, including branches in Ipswich, Bury St Edmunds, Colchester and Chelmsford.

The company’s administration also means that vouchers and gift cards, many of which were given as Christmas presents, will be worthless.

Squeezed by internet retailers and supermarkets, whose scale has enabled them to offer CDs and DVDs at cheaper prices, HMV’s boss Trevor Moore warned before Christmas that the entertainment group was in trouble.

Mr Moore said the group would fail to meet expectations for the year to April and that it would breach the terms of its loan agreements later this month.

Suppliers including Universal Music came to HMV’s rescue in January 2011 with a deal which helped the retailer shed some of its huge debt pile.

But according to the Financial Times, they balked at a request last week from HMV for about £300 million in additional financing to pay off its bank debt and fund an overhaul of the company’s business model.

HMV sought to diversify into live venues and consumer electronics and was forced to sell off several parts of its business, including the Waterstones book retailer, to reduce its debt pile, while closing loss-making stores.

But Neil Saunders, managing director of retail consultancy Conlumino, said the collapse of HMV was inevitable.

He added: “While many failures of recent times have been, at least in part, driven by the economy, HMV’s demise is a structural failure.

“In the digital era where 73.4% of music and film are downloaded or bought online, HMV’s business model has simply become increasingly irrelevant and unsustainable.”

Back in May last year, when former boss Simon Fox was still in charge, the group said it was looking for pre-tax profits of at least £10 million for the 2012/13 financial year.

His replacement joined the group from camera chain Jessops, which went into administration last week at the cost of 1,370 jobs across its 187 stores.

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2 comments

  • This just proves that this kind of product on the high street is no longer viable. HMV was technically the only one left barring a few smaller independents such as Fopp. So if there was a market, it should have flourished. It's an obvious sign there just isn't the market for this any more. A shame. But its been on the cards for a long time. High streets really will be all about fashion before too long! It's the only thing that can't entirely be taken online because of the "try on" before you buy requirement that means some people prefer to go in store.

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    Scott Brock

    Tuesday, January 15, 2013

  • Sad day for hmv, but saw it coming what we downloading and supermarkets offering the same stuff but a lot cheaper. Feel sorry for all the staff. Soon their be no shops in Ipswich.

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    james

    Tuesday, January 15, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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