max temp: 16°C

min temp: 8°C

ESTD 1874 Search

Suffolk: Future of Galloper off-shore wind project unclear after SSE pulls out

13:30 27 March 2014

The first turbine installation at the Greater Gabbard Offshore Wind Farm.

The first turbine installation at the Greater Gabbard Offshore Wind Farm.


The future of a planned wind farm off the Suffolk coast is uncertain after one of its backers announced it was pulling out of the project.


Scottish and Southern Energy (SSE) has announced that it would not continue its interest in the Galloper wind farm beyond the current phase of development.

The project is a joint venture between energy groups RWE Innogy UK and SSE. Its operations and maintenance base is expected to be built at Lowestoft port, creating long-term skilled engineering jobs and increasing security for the businesses that already support the Greater Gabbard wind farm operations base on the same site.

RWE Innogy UK said it needed time to fully understand what implications SSE’s decision may, or may not have, for the future direction of the project.

The announcement by SSE is part of a wider strategic review of its offshore wind development portfolio aimed at streamlining and simplifying its business.

In a statement, an SSE spokesman said: “SSE has decided not to take beyond the current phase of development its interest in the Galloper project.

“In its six-month financial report in November 2013, SSE said that decisions regarding the extent of the build out of its offshore wind farm pipeline would be based on its disciplined approach, consistent with its financial principles.

“That being so, and in the context of its wider capital and investment programme, SSE does not currently believe that the costs of constructing and operating Galloper, and the revenue likely to be earned from it once built will provide a return on SSE’s capital investment that will enable the project to compete successfully against other projects in SSE’s wider investment portfolio over Galloper’s planned construction timeline.

“As a result, SSE will now work with its partner and other stakeholders to secure the maximum possible value for its interest in the project.”

Galloper Offshore Wind Farm Ltd signed an agreement with Associated British Ports (ABP) in January to locate its operations and maintenance base on the old fish market site at Lowestoft port.

The site lies alongside the base for the existing Greater Gabbard wind farm, which will itself be a close neighbour of the Galloper turbines, construction work on which is due to start in 2016.

Although Galloper Offshore Wind Farm has not specified the number of jobs involved with the project, a spokesman said in January: “The local area will no doubt benefit from the multi-million pound conversion and the long-term skilled engineering jobs available at the port to staff the base.

“The investment into the ABP Port of Lowestoft is Galloper’s highest value, long-term contract awarded to date and reinforces the company’s commitment to investing into the South East area.”

The Galloper site is about 17 miles off the Suffolk coast and the wind farm will involve up to 140 turbines, with the potential to generate enough energy to power the equivalent of around 330,000 average UK households.

SSE also announced today that it would continue to invest in the Beatrice wind farm, off the Caithness coast, until the end of the year, when it would review its investment.

It would also continue to support the Seagreen, Forewind and Islay offshore wind farm projects in the short term but would not commit to further investment in the future unless it could be assured of the viability of the wider offshore wind industry.



  • Stephen, and what would be conventional reliable power? Finite coal,gas or nuclear.I tend to agree that the global warming argument is flawed but we are running out of stuff to burn.Frack on or should it be frack off?

    Report this comment


    Friday, March 28, 2014

  • In other words, SSE are not going to get enough subsidies from the already hard pressed billpayers to make their offshore windfarms profitable. They must also have realised that the political support for renewables is quietly dying, now that we know that global arming stopped 17 years ago and that the link with CO2 is tenuous at best. Perhaps we are at last beginning to end the irrational move to intermittent windpower at three times the cost of reliable conventional power.

    Report this comment

    Steven Whalley

    Thursday, March 27, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

A queue outside of a Greggs store.

Baker Greggs warned the new national living wage will put pressure on the group to raise the prices of its pasties and sausage rolls.

Home Secretary Theresa May arrives to deliver her speech at Manchester Central during the Conservative Party conference.

Theresa May faced an angry backlash from business leaders and refugee charities for falsely “vilifying” immigrants in a bid to boost her own political career.

Amanda Bond, Visit Suffolk brand manager

The value of Suffolk’s tourism industry has grown to £1.85billion a year, according to new figures, with the total, for the 2013 season, represents a rise of £50million over 2012.

Pigs Gone Wild campaign project leader  Norman Lloyd with the organisation's own pig sculpture.

Businesses are being urged to get behind a public art initiative which aims to raise £100,000 for the St Elizabeth Hospice in Ipswich.

Dr Aled Jones, Anglia Ruskin University.

The director of Anglia Ruskin University’s Global Sustainability Institute (GSI) is in the running to be named the greenest academic in the UK.

The presentation of the Gold award in the Community Relations Campaign category to Essex County Council at the CIPR Anglia Thames & Chiltern Pride Awards 2015

Photo:  Steve Pope - FOTOWALES

Public relations professionals across East Anglia have received recognition in the regional round of the 2015 PRide Awards.

New report on prosperity in seaside towns

New research has highlighted the importance of entrepreneurs in helping to revive seaside towns that have fallen into decline and unlock further potential in those already prospering.

Dan Poulter with employees at B&Q

A Suffolk MP has said he will do what he can to try and prevent a B&Q store closing down with the potential loss of around 100 jobs.

Helen Drage,  co-founder of Drage & Tozer Opticians.

Sudbury opticians firm Drage and Tozer, founded in 1995 by Helen Drage and Sandra Tozer, has celebrated 20 years in business by expanding into new premises.

Val Carrol, director of healthcare at Beckett Financial Services, receives the company’s Commendation at the Investment Life & Pensions Moneyfacts awards from comedian Tim Vine.

Bury St Edmunds-based Beckett Financial Services has been recognised by a national financial services publication for delivering outstanding levels of customer satisfaction to its healthcare clients.

Most read

Most commented

Topic pages