Rain

Rain

max temp: 26°C

min temp: 17°C

ESTD 1874 Search

UK: Horse meat traces found in burgers

09:29 16 January 2013

Tesco has withdrawn products from the supplier involved in the investigation from its shelves, and apologised to customers for any distress caused

Tesco has withdrawn products from the supplier involved in the investigation from its shelves, and apologised to customers for any distress caused

Scientific tests on beef products sold in Tesco, Lidl, Aldi, Iceland and Dunnes Stores uncovered low levels of the animal’s DNA.

shares

A total of 27 products were tested, with ten of them containing horse DNA and 23 pig DNA.

Horse meat accounted for approximately 29% of the meat content in one sample from Tesco.

Professor Alan Reilly, chief executive of the FSAI, said there was no health risk but also no reasonable explanation for horse meat to be found.

He said: “The products we have identified as containing horse DNA and/or pig DNA do not pose any food safety risk and consumers should not be worried.”

“Whilst there is a plausible explanation for the presence of pig DNA in these products due to the fact that meat from different animals is processed in the same meat plants, there is no clear explanation at this time for the presence of horse DNA in products emanating from meat plants that do not use horse meat in their production process.

“In Ireland, it is not in our culture to eat horse meat and therefore, we do not expect to find it in a burger.”

The retailers have told food safety chiefs they are removing all implicated products from their shelves.

Prof Reilly said traces of other meats would be unacceptable for people who may not eat certain food on religious grounds.

He added: “Likewise, for some religious groups or people who abstain from eating pig meat, the presence of traces of pig DNA is unacceptable.”

Beef burger products which tested positive for horse DNA were produced by Liffey Meats and Silvercrest Foods in Ireland and one UK plant, Dalepak Hambleton.

Silvercrest said it was pulling products from sale and replacing them with new lines.

Some 31 beef meal products such as cottage pie, beef curry pie and lasagne were tested, with 21 found to be positive for pig DNA. All tested negative for horse meat.

The DNA tests found horse in the following products: Tesco Everyday Value Beef Burgers 29.1%; Tesco Beef Quarter Pounders 0.1%; Oakhurst Beef Burgers in Aldi 0.3%; Moordale Quarter Pounders in Lidl 0.1%; Flamehouse Chargrilled Quarter Pounders in Dunnes Stores 0.1%; two varieties of Iceland Quarter Pounders 0.1%.

Even lower levels were recorded in Moordale Beef Burgers in Lidl and St Bernard Beef Burgers in Dunnes Stores.

Tim Smith, group technical director at Tesco, said: “Today we were informed that the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) has found that a number of beef products they have recently tested contained horse DNA.

“These included two frozen beef burger products sold by Tesco in both the UK and Ireland. Products sold at other retailers were also discovered to contain horse DNA.

“We immediately withdrew from sale all products from the supplier in question. We are working with the authorities in Ireland and the UK, and with the supplier concerned, to urgently understand how this has happened and how to ensure it does not happen again.

“We will not take any products from this site until the conclusion and satisfactory resolution of an investigation.

“We understand that many of our customers will be concerned by this news, and we apologise sincerely for any distress. Our customer service team is standing by to answer any questions customers may have.”

Aldi said they were conducting their own investigation.

“We have sought information from one supplier, Silvercrest, which is dealing directly with the FSAI on the issue that has been raised,” the company said.

In a statement, Lidl said it has taken the decision to remove all implicated products from sale pending a full investigation.

“A refund will be provided to customers who wish to return affected products,” said a spokesman.

end

shares

1 comment

  • Why the big fuss? If you're happy to eat ground-up bits of one dead mammal, why get wound up about a few bits of a different dead mammal?

    Report this comment

    beerlover

    Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Dame Fiona Kendrick:, chief executive of Nestlé  UK & Ireland

Food giant Nestlé has announced plans to close its defined benefit pension scheme, sparking the threat of industrial action.

The installation of solar panels on the roof of Precision Marketing Group's premises in Lamdin Road, Bury St Edmunds

A Suffolk-based firm will be among the organisations taking part in a nation-wide celebration of solar energy tomorrow.

Candy Gaga'’s Wanda Hewell, right, and daughter, Cherish.

Tower Ramparts in Ipswich now has its very own castle – thanks to the success of a local sweet shop business.

Stansted Airport

A report into the future of Britain’s airports does not rule out a second runway at Stansted – and raises fears of extra night flights to the Essex airport.

The Treasury has sold another 1% stake in Lloyds Banking Group.

The taxpayers’ stake in Lloyds Banking Group has fallen to below 16% after the Government sold off another tranche of shares.

Growth in manufacturing eased last month  to its slowest level in two years.

Britain’s manufacturing sector grew at its slowest pace in more than two years last month, impacted by subdued demand from Europe.

Speedy Hire
 has warned that its results for this year will come in

Tool rental business Speedy Hire saw nearly a third of its stock market value wiped off after it announced the shock departure of its chief executive and warned over a major blow to full year profits.

Greene King chief executive Rooney Anand.

Pubs and brewing group Greene King today posted another year of record revenues, with sales within its key Retail division topping £1billion for the first time.

Suffolk Coastal considers convenience store bid

Planning chiefs have responded to concerns about noise and antisocial behaviour arising from proposals for a new convenience store in Kesgrave by insisting on closing times being brought forward an hour and the installation of a barrier to restrict overnight parking.

Tim Dunford, managing director and master brewer at the Green Jack Brewery, third from left, with Beer for Summer judges Mark Dorber, left, and Charlie McVeigh of The Draft House, right, and Peter Gordon, on trade director of Budweiser Budvar.

A Suffolk brewing company is celebrating after winning a new national “Beer for Summer” competition.

Most read

Most commented

Topic pages