Rain

Rain

max temp: 4°C

min temp: -1°C

Search

Alde and Ore Estuary Partnership face growing concerns over controversial ‘enabling development’ house building proposals

PUBLISHED: 10:56 11 November 2017 | UPDATED: 10:56 11 November 2017

Members of the panel leading the Ale and Ore Estuary Partnership meeting, l-r, Richard Davey, Jane Maxim, Edward Greenwell and Lord Deben.  Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

Members of the panel leading the Ale and Ore Estuary Partnership meeting, l-r, Richard Davey, Jane Maxim, Edward Greenwell and Lord Deben. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

Campaigners seeking to save some of Suffolk’s most precious landscapes have defended proposals to raise millions of pounds by building homes on a protected beauty spot.

The meeting heard discussions about enabling development proposals to protect the Aldeburgh and Ore Estuary.  Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN The meeting heard discussions about enabling development proposals to protect the Aldeburgh and Ore Estuary. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

The Alde and Ore Estuary Partnership (AOEP) wants to raise £10million towards the estimated costs of defending acres of land from flooding along the coast from Bawdsey to Aldeburgh, and inland to Snape.

Its Save Our Suffolk Estuary campaign has seen celebrities, businesses and landowners join forces to highlight the importance of safeguarding river defences

The AOEP says without £12m of work, swathes of agricultural land worth millions to the economy, could be lost.

It hopes to raise funds from landowners, public contributions and special events. However its plans to raise £4m through “enabling development” has attracted opposition.

Around 120 people attended the event.  Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN Around 120 people attended the event. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

It would see 15-17 homes built on “exceptions sites” – farmland on which housing would not normally be permitted but could be allocated for such purposes, in recognition of the wider benefits.

Around 120 people attended the AOEP’s latest campaign event in Tunstall yesterday, many of whom opposed enabling development.

Troy Batley said it could lead to “planning creep” and more homes built on the estuary.

Suvi McCreadie questioned financial details, while Madeline Wynn asked why so little had been presented about the scheme.

Andrew Macdonald said AOEP could have done more to engage the community.

“We feel like we are being steered towards enabling development and yet it might not be as necessary as the partnership claim it is,” he added.

Sudbourne architect Howard Nash said he was “dismayed” the AOEP had not bid for Community Infrastructure Levy funding instead.

Former Environment Agency officer Stephen Worrall said AOEP’s flood warnings were “scaremongering”.

AOEP panel members defended enabling development, insisting it was necessary for the project, and refuted claims it would lead to more development.

Chairman Sir Edward Greenwell said: “We have no wish to trash the very landscape we are trying to preserve.”

Richard Davey, funding chairman, warned without community support, “the plan is dead”.

Lord Deben said it was no good to simply criticise enabling development, “you’ve got to have an alternative”.

The Harvest Centre, home of Brandon Full Gospel Church, held its Christmas meal on Saturday evening and this year invited people who had made a difference in the community.

Snow-lovers in Suffolk and Essex took full advantage of today’s weather by getting outside to enjoy the white stuff despite plummeting temperatures.

A woman arrested on suspicion of causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs has been released under investigation.

Kesgrave High School will be closed tomorrow after a major power failure.

A woman was raped in a car in Lowestoft yesterday in what police have described as a “despicable attack”.

Ipswich Town Hall will be 150 years old in January. John Norman looks at its story – one rarely dull.

Headteachers face an “impossible” task of deciding whether to close their school due to snow and fear looking “foolish” later in the day if forecasts prove to be inaccurate, education leaders say.

Most read

Eating Out in the Broads

cover

Click here to view
the Eating Out
supplement

View

Visit the Broads

cover

Click here to view
the Visit the Broads
supplement

View

London Boat Show 2018

cover

Click here to view
London Boat
Show supplement

View

Show Job Lists

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter
MyDate24 MyPhotos24