Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 21°C

min temp: 13°C

Search

East Anglia: Second wheat remains firm fixture in region’s rotations, survey finds

PUBLISHED: 16:00 13 July 2014

A second wheat crop

A second wheat crop

Archant

Second wheat looks like remaining a firm fixture in most East Anglian rotations despite the impending three crop rule being brought in as part of Common Agricultural Policy reform measures, escalating grass weed problems and weaker crop markets, according to the latest National Second Wheat Management study.

Susan Mintern of Monsanto Susan Mintern of Monsanto

A telephone survey of more than 100 East Anglian and East Midlands farmers, commissioned by seeds and agrochemical firm Monsanto this spring, revealed that 85% are intending to plant second wheat this autumn.

This is slightly down on the 87% with the crop currently in the ground but markedly up on the 80% growing it in the difficult 2012/13 season. There appears to be no significant change in the area of the crop being planned.

The majority of growers saw the three crop rule as having very little impact on their cropping plans, and they are continuing to focus on doing everything possible to maximise second wheat performance.

“The fact that 50% of growers now see a yield gap of less than 1 tonne/ha between their first and second wheats – against less than 40% in our 2009 study – suggests management improvements have being paying dividends,” said study co-ordinator, Susan Mintern of Monsanto Crop Protection.

“Indeed, more than a quarter are recording yield gaps of less than 0.5 tonne/ha these days compared to just 8% five years ago. And almost 10% find the performance of their second wheats is now on a par with their first wheats.”

Concerns over grass weed – especially blackgrass – control have escalated in recent years so that it now ranks alongside take-all among the top three challenges facing East Anglia second wheat growers, with foliar disease control remaining very much in third place.

Selecting good second wheat varieties, using a take-all seed treatment and preparing better seedbeds were the key management techniques being employed to address these challenges, with applying earlier spring nitrogen and delaying drilling also practised by 70% or more.

“The same five second wheat management priorities were identified by growers in our previous 2009 and 2011 studies,” said Susan.

The 2014 study reveals take-all seed treatment has become standard for more than two thirds of East Anglian growers, with the vast majority treating all their seed.

Comments have been disabled on this article.

The 10-year-old son of a military serviceman presented Prince Harry with a teddy bear as the Royal visited RAF Honington.

Prince Harry presented a new Colour to the RAF regiment at Honington this morning in its 75th anniversary year.

A Colchester teenager who was seriously injured in a tragic car crash and placed in an induced coma is starting to show promising signs of improvement.

A 73-year-old who died suddenly after a seemingly innocuous dog bite was fit and active, a neighbour has said.

The travellers who set up camp on the popular Nowton Park in Bury St Edmunds have left after a week’s stay.

Armed police have sealed off St Clement’s Church Lane in Ipswich this afternoon after reports of a man brandishing a BB gun.

A deputy headteacher retiring from a special school in Ipswich after more than 25 years had originally signed up to work just one day as a supply teacher.

Most read

Eating Out in the Broads

cover

Click here to view
the Eating Out
supplement

View

Visit the Broads

cover

Click here to view
the Visit the Broads
supplement

View

Show Job Lists

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter
MyDate24 MyPhotos24