Overcast

Overcast

max temp: 14°C

min temp: 11°C

ESTD 1874 Search

East Anglia: Second wheat remains firm fixture in region’s rotations, survey finds

16:00 13 July 2014

A second wheat crop

A second wheat crop

Archant

Second wheat looks like remaining a firm fixture in most East Anglian rotations despite the impending three crop rule being brought in as part of Common Agricultural Policy reform measures, escalating grass weed problems and weaker crop markets, according to the latest National Second Wheat Management study.

shares
Susan Mintern of MonsantoSusan Mintern of Monsanto

A telephone survey of more than 100 East Anglian and East Midlands farmers, commissioned by seeds and agrochemical firm Monsanto this spring, revealed that 85% are intending to plant second wheat this autumn.

This is slightly down on the 87% with the crop currently in the ground but markedly up on the 80% growing it in the difficult 2012/13 season. There appears to be no significant change in the area of the crop being planned.

The majority of growers saw the three crop rule as having very little impact on their cropping plans, and they are continuing to focus on doing everything possible to maximise second wheat performance.

“The fact that 50% of growers now see a yield gap of less than 1 tonne/ha between their first and second wheats – against less than 40% in our 2009 study – suggests management improvements have being paying dividends,” said study co-ordinator, Susan Mintern of Monsanto Crop Protection.

“Indeed, more than a quarter are recording yield gaps of less than 0.5 tonne/ha these days compared to just 8% five years ago. And almost 10% find the performance of their second wheats is now on a par with their first wheats.”

Concerns over grass weed – especially blackgrass – control have escalated in recent years so that it now ranks alongside take-all among the top three challenges facing East Anglia second wheat growers, with foliar disease control remaining very much in third place.

Selecting good second wheat varieties, using a take-all seed treatment and preparing better seedbeds were the key management techniques being employed to address these challenges, with applying earlier spring nitrogen and delaying drilling also practised by 70% or more.

“The same five second wheat management priorities were identified by growers in our previous 2009 and 2011 studies,” said Susan.

The 2014 study reveals take-all seed treatment has become standard for more than two thirds of East Anglian growers, with the vast majority treating all their seed.

shares
London Road North in Lowestoft has been cordoned off by emergency services.

Emergency services have descended on the centre of Lowestoft following an incident this afternoon.

Shotley wins Village of the Year.

Shotley has been announced the winner of the annual Suffolk Village of the Year competition.

Firefighters attended the incident

Emergency services were called to a crash on the A14 near Coddenham this afternoon.

It won't be the real thing, sadly, but there is an Abba tribute in Colchester this weekend

Brave the September weather this weekend and treat family and friends to a day out in East Anglia. Unsure where to go? Here are 10 events you shouldn’t miss:

The scene of a fire at Exning Primary School. Headteacher, James Clark.

Two members of the public tried to stop the blaze at Exning Primary School before the fire brigade arrived.

Ronald Chisnall

An 89-year-old widower who sexually assaulted two schoolgirls at his Ipswich home has been jailed for 34 months.

Fire crews at the scene of a fire behind the former Burton's factory in Ipswich Waterfront

Firefighters have been called to a fire at the former Burton’s factory on Ipswich Waterfront.

Jonathan Dotchin, Kezi Mellen UCS LGBT+ society with Valerie Jarvis of Theta Cafe with some of the items collected for Calais refugees.

Members of a university Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) society have launched a collection for refugees in Calais.

The A14

Emergency teams worked to release a man trapped in his car after it overturned on the A14.

Hungarian soldiers put razor wire on top of a fence on the border with Serbia to tackle the refugee crisis. Photo: AP Photo/Darko Bandic

Essex-wide talks should be held on how councils can help with the current refugee crisis, according to the leader of Colchester Borough Council.

Most read

Most commented

Topic pages