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Euston: Duke of Grafton forced to spend £40,000 to save protected newts on Euston Estate

18:12 12 May 2014

Euston Estate Manager, Andrew Blenkiron, with the fence which was put in place during conservation work after great crested newts were discovered while building a reservoir on the estate.

Euston Estate Manager, Andrew Blenkiron, with the fence which was put in place during conservation work after great crested newts were discovered while building a reservoir on the estate.

European Union rules have forced a Suffolk duke to spend £40,000 to save 10 protected newts on his country estate.

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Plans to create a 60 million gallon reservoir at the Duke of Grafton’s Euston Estate, near Thetford, were delayed when officials called for staff to save great crested newts in the location before building work could begin.

Andrew Blenkiron, estate manager, said extensive work, including constructing 7,000ft of 18inch-high fencing to enclose the 20 acres around the proposed reservoir, had cost about £4,000 per newt.

Some 400 buckets – which had to be checked twice a day – were then placed on the ground around the reservoir site to trap any newts.

The European Union has declared the newts as endangered and placed them on a protected species list.

“I am obviously very disappointed that we had to follow the route of a full planning process,” Mr Blenkiron said.

“Farmers take everything in their stride and get on and do what they need to do but this has cost an awful lot of money and time.

“It has also delayed our business expansion plans by two years.”

He said that initial reservoir plans were rejected as planning officers called for the estate to apply for full planning permission.

This meant additional surveys were required, including ecological studies, before the reservoir could be dug on the 10,500-acre estate.

The Government body, Natural England, enforces the EU guidance. A spokeswoman for the group said: “The legislation around European protected species is really rigorous.”

The estate’s spending included having to provide two new ponds for the newts to replace one being lost because of the reservoir plan.

An additional £60,000 was required for further survey and excavation work to ensure the reservoir does not destroy any buried artefacts. Mr Blenkiron said the estate was given a Government grant, funded by EU money, of £110,000 for the reservoir project which is to cost between £320,000 and £350,000.

But instead of this being spent on the building of the reservoir, which is to be used to increase the estate’s crop production, it will be used to pay additional fees.

The estate, which is currently the home of Henry FitzRoy, known as Harry, who is the 12th duke. It has been the Grafton family’s base for more than 300 years.

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4 comments

  • As an ex girlfriend of mine used to say "my heart bleeds custard" !

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    freedomf

    Tuesday, May 13, 2014

  • Are we supposed to care about how much this very wealthy Estate spends TO COMPLY WITH THE LAW? We all have to spend money to comply with the law. What concerns me more is the VAST amount of taxpayers' money given by the EU to wealthy landowners for a variety of projects whilst ordinary people and other businesses have to fund them out of their own pockets. The UK is run by landowners and their chums for the benefit of landowners and their chums.

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    Johnthebap

    Tuesday, May 13, 2014

  • Given a grant for £110,000 and being a Duke and farmer, are we supposed to have sympathy for him or give him a pat on the back for helping to save the newts to which he has been told to do. To give something back to the land he owns and farms should be more of a pleasure than a burden on his finances.

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    ran 528

    Monday, May 12, 2014

  • I have some of these dear little newts too, in my small garden pond. Lovely to hear that their protection is being enforced. He can afford it...!!

    Report this comment

    Fi, Stowmarket

    Monday, May 12, 2014

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