A man who allowed cattle carcasses to decompose on his farm near Saxmundham has pleaded guilty to Animal by-products and Cattle registration offences.

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Eric Moss’ Botany Farm in Farnham was inspected by Suffolk Trading Standards and Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency in a joint operation last year.

The carcasses, which had not been stored or disposed of in compliance with legislation, were found during the inspection.

Moss’ company, ARP Farms Limited, was found to have breached Cattle Identification legislation by not registering the births and deaths of cattle kept at Botany Farm.

Both the company and Moss were first charged with the offences in April of this year.

Yesterday Moss, appearing as an individual and as a representative of ARP Farms Limited, pleaded guilty to five counts of Animal by-products Regulation offences and five counts of Cattle Identification Regulation offences.

Suffolk county councillor Colin Spence, cabinet member for public protection, said “Suffolk Trading Standards, the Animal Health Veterinary Laboratory Agency and farming organisations such as the National Farmers Union are always keen to provide advice to farmers who are responsible for farmed animals.

“However allowing cattle carcasses to remain open to the elements and not registering cattle is totally unacceptable and action will be taken against keepers of farmed animals who do not meet these legal requirements put in place to ensure disease risk is kept to a minimum.

“Farmers play a vital part in helping to prevent and report diseases when they occur as well as stopping them from spreading.”

Sentencing for these offences will take place at Ipswich Crown Court on October 9 this year.

Further allegations against ARP Farms Limited and Moss, concerning breaches of Animal Health Act and Welfare of Farmed Animals Regulations at Botany Farm over the same period of time, are to be heard at a later date.

A Suffolk County Council statement said the correct storage and disposal of dead cattle, as well as cattle identification and traceability, is important in preventing the spread of diseases such as BSE.

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