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Gallery: Nature’s beautiful carpet transforms our woodlands as bluebells blossom in Suffolk

PUBLISHED: 18:30 29 April 2014 | UPDATED: 18:30 29 April 2014

Bluebells near Campsea Ashe with large rhea wandering through - Richard Kemp

Bluebells near Campsea Ashe with large rhea wandering through - Richard Kemp

RJ Kemp

Suffolk’s rolling countryside has a glistening blue and purple tinge after being treated to a proliferation of early-season bluebells.

It is little wonder readers have inundated our mailboxes with enchanting photographs of the ancient woodlander; considered the nation’s favourite wild flower.

The bluebells carpeting the county have emerged early this year, transforming Suffolk into a sea of blue.

It was only 12 months ago when the coldest March since 1962 left fields barren of the bluebell in a disappointing spring.

“They are flowering far earlier than in last year’s cold spring when things were generally three weeks behind,” said Audrey Boyle, communications manager at the Suffolk Wildlife Trust.

“This year we have had peak displays of bluebells just when everyone’s been out and about at Easter – so they have been thoroughly appreciated.

“Walking through acres of bluebells on a mild spring day is without a doubt one of the most uplifting wildlife experiences.

“Bluebell woods epitomise the English countryside, and here in Suffolk we are fortunate that there are still outstanding examples.”

The bluebell starts growing in January with its sole purpose to flower before the other woodland plants.

The first bluebell leaves appear in January and the plants are usually in full bloom by late April or early May.

The timing of flowering depends on elevation, latitude, aspect, soils, geology and climate conditions.

Peter Bash, a contributing iwitness member, said: “A deserted scented wood, with no sound but the birds and the crack of a twig underfoot.

“Scenes like this are the stuff that dreams are made of, and definitely far from the maddening crowd of city life and shopping malls.”

Visit www.suffolkwildlifetrust.org/bluebells for more.

Arthur Scoffield cried when he watched Saving Private Ryan at the cinema. The horrific realism of war depicted by Steven Spielberg perhaps got the better of the proud old Ipswich soldier.

The mother of missing RAF serviceman Corrie McKeague says she would rather be “waiting for a phone call than not” despite the agony of what news from the landfill site means.

Two people suffered the effects of cold after their dinghy capsized in water off Wrabness, near Harwich.

A 25-year-old man who died in a car crash in Long Melford was driving at more than double the speed limit at almost twice the drink drive limit, while on his mobile phone with defective tyres on his car, an inquest has heard.

The manager of an Essex pub that has been banned from holding outdoor music events due to noise complaints has spoken of the “ongoing battle” staff have faced with neighbours and councillors.

A former Suffolk Sea Cadet instructor who was given a suspended prison sentence after he had sex with a 15-year-old girl has been locked up for six months after he broke a court order banning him from having unsupervised contact with any other young girls.

A campaign aiming to raise £40,000 towards the creation of a law centre in Suffolk has received a cash boost from two companies.

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