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Gallery: Czechoslovakian wolfdog trained to search for missing dogs

17:20 15 July 2014

Sam Bryce with her Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, Loki.
Loki has been trained to search for lost dogs
His training is similar to that used by the police as his wolf genes give him an excellent sense of smell.

Sam Bryce with her Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, Loki. Loki has been trained to search for lost dogs His training is similar to that used by the police as his wolf genes give him an excellent sense of smell.

Archant

There’s a new dog in town – and he’s offering a unique service.

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Loki, a 15-month-old Czechoslovakian wolfdog living in Mendham, near Halesworth, has been trained to search for lost dogs, and his owner believes he is the first of his kind in the UK to do so.

The breed initially comes from crossing a wolf with a German shepherd, and over the years has been used by the military to track and search.

Loki’s owner, Sam Bryce, said: “What they got was a dog that had awesome noses for tracking.

“Within a few weeks he found an abandoned litter of kittens.

“We then did some things to see if he was interested in following a scent and he was.

“It’s all about trust. You have to trust him that we’re following what we want to be following.”

“He’s not had to take a lot of training. We had to teach him to put up with me!”

Ms Bryce added that although the dogs have become popular because of television programmes and films, they do have their moments.

She said: “They can be very destructive, and they don’t like being on their own.

“I got him when I knew I could give him the time and commitment.

“They are very loyal dogs, and you only have to show them something once and they know how to do it.”

The breed, which became popular in the late 1990s, was banned by Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA). Ms Bryce said this was because they wanted to investigate the breed. She added: “In 
2006 they lifted the ban, but there’s that stigma attached to them.”

Despite his work in the field, away from his job Loki can be hard work.

Ms Bryce said: “They argue and they like to have the last word. They’re very demanding dogs.

“But he’s wonderful. He’s the most loyal dog I’ve ever had.”

The search Ms Bryce and Loki offer is free. For more information on the service call 07810 641818.

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9 comments

  • The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog was bred by the military in Czechoslovakia in the 1950s. They became a recognised breed of dog. After the civil war, Slovakia became responsible for the breed, but the name stayed the same.

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    Loki"nose"the way

    Wednesday, July 16, 2014

  • The Czechoslovakian wolfdog was developed in 1950s by the Czechoslovakian military. The breed was recognised as a bred of dog and made its way across Europe. After the civil war Slovakia took on the responsibility of the dog, but the name remained the same. The bred originates from a direct cross of a wolf and GSD. I suggest you visit www.orkwolf.co.uk to get the full history.

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    Loki"nose"the way

    Tuesday, July 15, 2014

  • http:en.wikipedia.orgwikiCzechoslovakian_Wolfdog Dim wits!!!

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    Orkwolf Wolfdogs

    Tuesday, July 15, 2014

  • It's the name of the breed, not a description of where it was born you dim-witted fool. A German shepherd would still be German shepherd even if the country ceased to be.

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    Jemma

    Tuesday, July 15, 2014

  • LOL dim wits, there speaks the ill educated. The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is a national breed and that is its registered name!

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    Orkwolf Wolfdogs

    Tuesday, July 15, 2014

  • That is the correct name for the breed regardless as to whether the name of the Country has changed, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog or Československý Vlčiak Vlcak is the registered national breed with the FCI, Fédération Cynologique Internationale, Europe's stricter version of the Kennel Club.

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    Orkwolf Wolfdogs

    Tuesday, July 15, 2014

  • Well, it's only 21 years since Czechoslovakia was dissolved. Evidently too recent for the dim-wits round here to have heard about it.

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    beerlover

    Tuesday, July 15, 2014

  • The correct term for the CsV breed is as stated in the article Czechoslovakian Wolfdog or in Czech or Slovakian Československý vlčiak vlcak this is the recognised FCI , Fédération Cynologique Internationale, breed standard name. www.orkwolf.co.uk

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    Orkwolf Wolfdogs

    Tuesday, July 15, 2014

  • Great story. But....... No such thing as Czechoslovakian now. Its either the Czech Republic or Slovakia :)

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    mr angry

    Tuesday, July 15, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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