Overcast

Overcast

max temp: 3°C

min temp: 2°C

ESTD 1874 Search

Gallery: Have you experienced a thrilling encounter with a red kite?

18:50 02 April 2014

Coming back from work near Huntingdon, I saw this kite sitting in tree opposite the farm entrance   - Graham Welham

Coming back from work near Huntingdon, I saw this kite sitting in tree opposite the farm entrance - Graham Welham

(c) copyright citizenside.com

Time was when the only place in Britain red kites could be seen were the wooded valleys of mid-Wales.

Thankfully, that is not the case today. Far from it. These large, spindly, angular and impressive birds of prey, once widespread over much of Britain and useful as cleaners-up of street carrion in less hygienic times, were wiped out from the majority of their range in the 19th Century by the gun and by poison.

Those mid-Wales valleys were their last stronghold. Until, that is, a welcome comeback brought about by an official re-introduction programme involving the RSPB and the then Nature Conservancy Council using birds from across Europe.

After the early days of the scheme in 1989 they have spread out from the programme’s heartlands of the Chilterns, the east Midlands, Yorkshire, the North-East and parts of Scotland. The species now breeds in small numbers in some areas in the eastern counties, although colonisation of Suffolk is proving a slow affair, with only a handful of nests reported.

Nevertheless, experiencing a thrilling encounter with a red kite virtually anywhere in the county is now much more likely than it has been for decades. Whereas for years it was purely a rather scarce passage migrant to and from the Continent, mainly in early spring and late autumn, the species is now a fairly frequent sight, especially in the Suffolk Brecks and along the coast.

It is larger and more attenuated than the stocky common buzzard, for example, its long, relatively thin wings and long, deeply forked and “twisty” tail, together with its bright russet tones, are the key identification features. On any warm, sunny day this spring – over almost any Suffolk field, wood, heath or reedbed - the red kite may well be lazily flapping or majestically soaring. It is certainly worth looking up into the wide blue yonder occasionally. The comeback kite is a sight worth seeing.

We asked readers to send us their photos via iwitness24.

4 comments

  • never with a red kite but once with a red head

    Report this comment

    pandy

    Thursday, April 3, 2014

  • spotted one over needham market 2 weeks ago and another at micklemere near ixworth last week.

    Report this comment

    david peters

    Wednesday, April 2, 2014

  • In oxfordshire these things are as common as muck. When they were combining last year, we counted 22 kites and a couple of buzzards circling at the same time. The pigeon is an endangered species compared to the kite now and flies at an average height of about 15ft. I guess that's conservation for you.......

    Report this comment

    jakeb

    Wednesday, April 2, 2014

  • never with a red kite but once with a red head

    Report this comment

    pandy

    Thursday, April 3, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

Traffic

A driver has been forced to pull over on the A14 after an “object” fell from the back of a lorry, smashing their windscreen.

The Orwell Bridge.

Two breakdowns on the Orwell Bridge were reported to be causing delays for drivers this morning.

Police at the scene of the armed raid in Clacton

Detectives investigating a “very frightening” attempted armed robbery at a north Essex supermarket in which shots were fired have recovered a car used by the suspects.

Community leaders fear the park and ride will bring more traffic into Wickham Market. Credit: Mike Page

Park and ride proposals linked with Suffolk’s new nuclear power station are anticipated to more than double traffic volumes through parts of a village – causing “extreme concern” for residents.

The We Love Bury St Edmunds supporters photo bomb the statue of St Edmund celebrating over a year since the group was born - founder James Sheen

Andy Abbott reports on how Facebook group “We Love Bury St Edmunds” has brought thousands of people together from across the globe.

Emma King from Ipswich  died from leaukemia aged 17. Left to right, Emma's step-sister Jamie Green, her mother Kathy King and step-father Shaun Green.

The mother of a brave Ipswich teenager who died of a rare form of leukaemia at the age of 17 says she ‘always had a smile on her face’.

Ex Royal Air Force Serviceman Richard Philpotts, of Stowmarket, Suffolk was sentenced on 16 January 2017 to three years’ imprisonment following conviction in relation to a single victim of one offence of indecent assault on a child below the age of 14, committed between 1986 and 1987.

A former RAF corporal and scout master has been jailed at a court martial for three years for the sexual abuse of a boy scout more than 30 years ago in Germany.

Most read

Great Days Out

cover

Click here to view
the Great Days Out
supplement

View

Most commented

HOT JOBS

Show Job Lists

Streetlife

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

MyDate24 MyPhotos24