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Ipswich: Relative of Cranfield’s Mill worker killed in First World War is having new memorial made for Waterfront site

12:30 13 August 2014

In honour of his uncle who died in WWI, Ivan Trusler has paid for a new war memorial to go on the Dance East building after the old one was destroyed when the building was revamped.

In honour of his uncle who died in WWI, Ivan Trusler has paid for a new war memorial to go on the Dance East building after the old one was destroyed when the building was revamped.

The nephew of a former Cranfield’s Mill worker who died in the First World War is forking out hundreds of pounds for a new memorial on Ipswich’s waterfront.

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In honour of his uncle who died in WWI, Ivan Trusler has paid for a new war memorial to go on the Dance East building after the old one was destroyed when the building was revamped.In honour of his uncle who died in WWI, Ivan Trusler has paid for a new war memorial to go on the Dance East building after the old one was destroyed when the building was revamped.

Ivan Trusler’s uncle William was a boy cook aboard HM Trawler Burnley, named after the last post-war team to win the FA Cup.

The boy cook was just 16 when he was killed aboard the Harwich-based ship, sunk by a mine on November 25, 1916 off Orford Ness. He was remembered with other former Cranfield’s workers who died during the war on a plaque at the mill.

Mr Trusler said he first came across the plaque by chance.

“I went to the Cranfield’s Mill on business and there was a war memorial at the car park,” he said. “I was quite amazed to find my uncle’s name on it.”

This easterly view includes Packards Artificial Fertiliser works on the extreme left with Ransomes Simms and Jeffries Orwell Works left of centre and old gasworks on right hand side. The lighter barges in the dock were used as additional grain storage by Cranfields for seasonal imports of hard wheat for bread flour manufacture.This easterly view includes Packards Artificial Fertiliser works on the extreme left with Ransomes Simms and Jeffries Orwell Works left of centre and old gasworks on right hand side. The lighter barges in the dock were used as additional grain storage by Cranfields for seasonal imports of hard wheat for bread flour manufacture.

But when the site was redeveloped the memorial was removed.

Mr Trusler said: “(Historian) Taff Gillingham contacted me and said he knew someone who knew something about it.

“This other person was also a war historian and by chance he was in the Cranfield’s car park and he saw a skip with the remains of the war memorial in.

“I thought it was sacrilege and I couldn’t understand why it wasn’t protected. That led me to decide to do something about it.”

Unable to find out for certain if the remains of the memorial had been saved or destroyed, Mr Trusler set about sorting out a replacement.

“If we could trace the original memorial we would have pieced it together but someone took a photo of it and that way we’ve got everyone’s names.

“We found a company that could make a suitable plaque. It’s going to be four foot by two foot, so it’ll be quite substantial.

“It’s going to cost more than £300 but I’m paying for it out of my own money because I feel so strongly about it.”

The plaque, which will be made of silver laminate with black engraving, will be installed at DanceEast’s Jerwood Dance House close to the site of the original.

Mr Trusler hopes to have a ceremony unveiling the new memorial in September or October.

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4 comments

  • I should add, what a fantastic gesture by Mr. Trusler.

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    DSealy

    Thursday, August 14, 2014

  • This is shameful and symptomatic of the planners failure to value and protect the history of Ipswich, let alone enhance it. How were the developers allowed to get away with this? Similarly, the lettering on the Cranfields building on College Street shouldn't have been allowed to be vandalised and then covered by the developers. Shows no respect for the history of the waterfront, the people and industries that helped build the town.

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    DSealy

    Thursday, August 14, 2014

  • Terence Manning I totally agree with you ,

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    MIGUEL100

    Wednesday, August 13, 2014

  • the people who done the work on the site should pay for it.what a nasty dont care attitude to treat a memorial this way.

    Report this comment

    TERENCE MANNING

    Wednesday, August 13, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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