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Kesgrave: Frustration as treasured cedar tree is set to be shortened

18:05 21 February 2013

Ray Burgess with one of the last remaining Cedars in Kesgrave. Suffolk Costal District Council are planning to remove approx 40 ft from the top of it

Ray Burgess with one of the last remaining Cedars in Kesgrave. Suffolk Costal District Council are planning to remove approx 40 ft from the top of it

Archant

A DISGRUNTLED man has voiced his concerns after council officers approved plans to shorten a treasured cedar tree.

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A number of years ago Ray Burgess, of Carlton Road in Kesgrave, successfully applied for a preservation order to be put in place for a cedar tree outside his home.

But today, he spoke of his sadness after Suffolk Coastal District Council agreed the top of the tree could be lopped following a complaint from a neighbour of Mr Burgess.

Mr Burgess, 69, said: “Cedar trees have an important place in the history of Kesgrave and I am so disappointed and annoyed that this is going ahead, despite a preservation order that I secured many years ago.

“By cutting the top of the tree off, the council will stop people enjoying it from a distance. They will ruin this beautiful tree by cutting such a massive amount off the top of it.”

However, a spokesman for Suffolk Coastal District Council said the decision had been made after safety concerns were raised.

The spokesman said: “An application was submitted by Mr Burgess’ neighbour after discussions with our tree officer about what could be done to resolve the problems he was facing with a 20m-plus cedar tree in his garden which has a preservation order dating back 24 years that was initiated by Mr Burgess.

“It was agreed that about one-third of the tree could be lopped so as to end the dangers of bits of the tree falling down into this resident’s garden.

“The tree and the proposed works have been assessed by both our previous and current tree officer who both came to the same conclusion that the proposed works were a reasonable request.”

He said the work would allow the tree to “survive and prosper”, while also ensuring the safety of the applicant.

Mr Burgess’ neighbours declined to comment on the matter.

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5 comments

  • I offer Mr Burgess my total support on this matter and am so sorry that a magnificent tree which has taken decades to grow, has to be decimated in this way. Sadly we seem to live in a world of tree haters these days. People whinge about their loss of light (minimal and to which they have no legal right(, subsidence (a temporary one dry summer fad) and an imagined danger from falling branches. Councils seem eager to become involved in these issues, and always side with the complainant with a 'compromise' of hacking off huge chunks of tree which forever damage its shape and profile. Nowadays many people just want sterile bits of lawn and patio with access to as much cancer-inducing sun as possible. What a shame Mr Burgess that these people don't notice ancient trees before they move near to them. My sympathies that this historic tree has to be butchered, it has stood the test of time, but councils are more powerful than God I'm afraid!

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    Jane Summerfield

    Thursday, February 21, 2013

  • How predictable. One complaint and the powers that be jump to attention like little toy soldiers. I'm assuming the tree was there when Mr Burgess's neighbour purchased the property, and that therefore heshe would have been aware of the Preservation order prior to purchase?

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    Suffolk Boy

    Thursday, February 21, 2013

  • Its a tree. Just plant another one. The should cut it down and use it for paper

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    the opinion man

    Thursday, February 21, 2013

  • 'Tel' subsidence is not a major problem at all. It was the last big panic when we had a couple of dry summers. Those that want trees removed and those that do the work will 'big up' subsidence for their own ends, but it is grossly oversold. These particular trees are not thirstly as an oak would be, and they look some distance from the properties. But sadly some people can't bear trees anywhere near them and the usual excuse is 'what if a branch fell on someone?'. Which is a bit like saying 'I must give up my car in case I have an accident'. How many people do you know who have had a tree branch fall on them - but the threat of a legal case in the future puts the fear of God into most government bodies. What a pity we can't enjoy these magnificent trees without someone having to complain.

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    Jane Summerfield

    Friday, February 22, 2013

  • if the lady did more research, she would find that subsidence is a major problem and trees are the main cause

    Report this comment

    tel

    Thursday, February 21, 2013

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