Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 21°C

min temp: 13°C

ESTD 1874 Search

Minsmere: RSPB explains culling of its red deer

12:52 14 January 2014

Red deer at Minsmere.

Red deer at Minsmere.

A wildlife conservation charity has explained the culling of 250 red deer at a nature reserve as a “necessary way of maintaining the wonderful landscape” of the Suffolk coast.

shares

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) said the herd at Minsmere had increased greatly in recent years and was having an adverse impact on the habitats of other wildlife.

“In order to protect these iconic habitats such as the heath and reed beds at Minsmere, the RSPB needs to take action to reduce the current populations of deer,” said a spokesman for the charity.

“The decision to control deer was not taken lightly.”

A visitor to the site, however, has criticised the move, which he feels is at odds with the objectives of the UK’s largest nature conservation charity.

Wildlife enthusiast Duncan Wright, a frequent visitor to Minsmere, said that he could acknowledge the need to cull but felt it had been “poorly handled” by the RSPB.

The 54-year-old Leiston man, who renounced his membership to the charity after he learned about the magnitude of the cull, suggests it should have been carried out more regularly but on a smaller scale and with greater transparency.

“It seems in my view immensely hypocritical for an organisation purporting to have nature conservation as its core remit to even consider this, let alone actively sanction it,” he said. Mr Wright also claims to have discovered three deer carcasses on a public lane accessing the reserve, which he felt most nature lovers would find distressing and unnecessary.

The RSPB explained that deer control is a legal and widely undertaken part of countryside management, which it had determined to be the “only remaining option to 
safeguard the integrity of the habitat”.

Although the charity said it would continue to maintain red deer at the reserve, it explained that with no predators to control the population naturally, it was important to “strike a balance” so that the other habitats were also protected.

“The RSPB wants to continue to attract visitors to the Suffolk coast so that future generations continue to be inspired by their natural surroundings,” a spokesman for the charity said.

“This can only be achieved if we manage the special habitats here so that the species like bitterns, otters and marsh harriers can thrive.”

shares

3 comments

  • Mr Wright? Mr Wrong. Carry on RSPB. The deer population needs stringent control.

    Report this comment

    Rita WAG

    Tuesday, January 14, 2014

  • Disgraceful behaviour by the RSPB. Another charity I shall now abandon. Shame on them.

    Report this comment

    JOHN BURLS

    Tuesday, January 14, 2014

  • If it's predators you need then I'd be happy to ship a few of the Coyotes, Bobcats and feral dogpacks that prowl my Tennessee ridgetop property ... they seem to do an excellent job of thinning my Whitetail Deer, not to mention my family cats ! Mick

    Report this comment

    mick471

    Tuesday, January 14, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

Fire crews were called to Glemsford

A frantic search for a woman trapped in mud and lost was underway in Glemsford earlier – with fire, police and ambulance crews called to help.

An accident has caused travel delays

A 79-year-old man has died following a collision involving a trailer that had separated from a tractor as it travelled along an Essex road.

The Woolpack in Ipswich

Seven teenagers were arrested after a street fight spilled into a busy pub located near to Ipswich Music Day.

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Princess Charlotte of Cambridge and Prince George of Cambridge arrive at the Church of St Mary Magdalene on the Sandringham Estate for the Christening of Princess Charlotte of Cambridge. Photo by Chris Jackson - WPA Pool/Getty Images

Princess Charlotte was christened in front of the Queen and close family and friends today as the Cambridges had their first public outing as a family of four.

Thousands of visitors attended the Ipswich Music Day in Christchurch Park on Sunday.
L-R Donna Allport,Tony Croft,Hannah Cruse.

The annual Ipswich Music Day in Christchurch Park is well underway after a wet start to proceedings.

An appreciative crowd enjoying the entertainment at the first Bury Folk Festival held in the walled garden at Nowton Park on Saturday.
Bury Folk Collective chairman Brian Kew who performed with twelve-year-old Francesca Akehurst

Hundreds of people visited Nowton Park for a folk festival’s inaugural event at the weekend.

The Women on Wheels bike ride sets out from Nowton Park near Bury.

Almost 200 women got on their bikes for charity earlier today and cycled hundreds of miles to support St Nicholas Hospice.

An Abellio Greater Anglia train at Colchester

Train delays through Suffolk and Essex have been caused by urgent repairs to a railway bridge between Witham and Hatfield Peverel.

1st Woodbridge Scout Group take part in the Woodbridge carnival procession.

This year’s Woodbridge Carnival was particularly special for several reasons.

Delays have been caused after a two-vehicle collision on the A11. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo.

A person has been taken to hospital after a two-vehicle crash left one car upside down off the A11.

Most read

Most commented

Topic pages