Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 18°C

min temp: 11°C

ESTD 1874 Search

NFU opinion: How to feed the world - the 11bn person question

06:00 26 May 2014

Former NFU Essex County Chairman Robert Stacey

Former NFU Essex County Chairman Robert Stacey

Archant

It’s another day, just like any other, writes former NFU Essex county chairman Robert Stacey

shares

You’ve woken up and switched on the light, washed with the hot water that’s expected from the tap, had breakfast (most of which has been brought the previous day from a supermarket) then off to work, quite likely in your car, perhaps via the petrol station to fill up en route.

It’s the sort of morning that happens to millions of people all around the world, the sort of morning that is normal and taken for granted, but for how long?

Recent events, not only here but all around the world, should be starting to ring alarm bells. A changing climate is triggering more extreme weather events.

Combined with an increasing world population, volatile commodity prices and political unrest, as well as ever increasing bureaucracy imposed not only on farming but all walks of life, this slowly threatens our ability to maintain what we consider to be a normal life.

The United Nations predicts that the world population will rise to between nine and 11 billion people during the second half of this century and that unless there is a substantial reduction in global greenhouse gasses our ability to feed this growing population will pose probably the greatest challenge mankind has ever faced.

Now I don’t wish to sound like a messenger of doom as I am sure that man’s ingenuity will enable us to meet that challenge, but to do so we may well have to adapt and change the way we live.

Our two greatest needs are for energy and food. Right up until the 1980s the UK was self-sufficient in energy, as we had vast quantities of coal, oil and natural gas, but now we rely on ever-increasing imports. These include liquefied gas from the Middle East as well as electricity generated abroad using Russian gas, hardly a secure supply judging by recent events.

But it is food, and whether we can produce enough, that should be of major concern. In the UK our ability to feed our own population from home-grown food is reducing every year due to more extreme weather events, an increasing population and less agricultural land available due to development and environmental restrictions. It is estimated that the date when we would run out of food if we only consumed home-grown produce is 14 August.

Now of course that’s not going to happen due to imports but I do wonder if it is sensible to be so reliant on imported food. Only a small squeeze on the global supply chain, such as drought, which a few years ago caused a massive rise in food prices, or political unrest, as in North Africa or the Ukraine, can easily threaten that chain.

So when you wake and start your ‘normal’ day just spend a few moments and imagine what it would be like if the light failed to shine, the water was stone cold, the shop shelves were empty and there was no fuel at the garage.

Please don’t take it all for granted as our modern way of living may well impact on the very survival of our children and grandchildren.

shares

1 comment

  • I would wonder why we allowed the EU politikers to impose sanctions on Russia which might lose us our most important source of gas, and I would wonder why our farmers were so anxious to cover arable land with solar panels, and I would wonder why we think it is Green to sell Carbon Credits to other countries, so that they can put back into the atmosphere, all that CO2 that we have so carefully avoided doing ourselves. I might even wonder why we thought it Green to chop up trees in North America, and ship them over here, to be burnt in a power station, thus putting back into the atmosphere, all the CO2 that they have absorbed in their lifetime. Perhaps we should all wonder what the heck we are playing at.

    Report this comment

    Rolf

    Monday, May 26, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

Police at the scene of the attack on London Road South, Pakefield.

A jilted boyfriend has been found guilty of plotting to “horrifically disfigure” his ex-girlfriend, along with co-defendant Leon Thompson.

Grafitti under the A14 B1113 Newton Road bridge.

Colourful street art which has appeared on an underpass on the outskirts of a Suffolk town has sparked a debate about whether provisions should be made for it to become a feature elsewhere in the area.

Police at the scene of the shooting at Forum Court in Bury St Edmunds.

A man has been re-arrested after the Forum Court shooting.

Cultural Review published into ECFRS.

This morning Irene Lucas has presented her independent Cultural Review into behaviour at Essex County Fire and Rescue Service to the brigade and public.

Eddie Brown in 2004

Tributes have been paid to a former Suffolk world darts champion who has died at the age of 78.

Staff and volunteers at Ipswich Library with some of the top ten books in Suffolk 
Matt Shenton, Marion Harvey, Calum Holmes and Hannah Daly

A woman with dementia in a desperate bid to find her best friend, an internal fight to fill a parish council seat and dealing with conspiracy and sabotage to take control of the family business.

Proposed housing site in Poplar Lane , behind the Holiday Inn ,Ipswich.

Almost 500 new homes could be built on the edge of Ipswich in a move which has prompted concern among local residents.

Police

Armed officers attended Knights Way in Dunmow at around 10pm yesterday following reports of a man carrying two firearms.

Fuel fraudster in court

A fuel fraudster has been given a community order after failing to pay garages for fuel on seven occasions.

Jonathan Weatherley

Tributes to a cyclist who died on August 23 after a Twinstead crash have been paid by the family.

Most read

Most commented

Topic pages