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RAF Lakenheath F-15E fighter jets drop live bombs on north coast of Scotland in USAF exercise

13:22 28 February 2014

RAF Lakenheath

RAF Lakenheath's 492nd Fighter Squadron drop bombs in Scotland

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Fighter jets from RAF Lakenheath have been carrying out live weapons drops in Scotland as part of a training exercise.

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RAF Lakenheath's 492nd Fighter Squadron drop bombs in ScotlandRAF Lakenheath's 492nd Fighter Squadron drop bombs in Scotland

Dramatic images released by the US Air Force (USAF) show F-15E fighters from the 492nd Fighter Squadron dropping live Guided Bomb Unit-12s (GBU-12) on the far northern border of Scotland at Cape Wrath.

The exercise, on February 10, was the first live munitions drop along the northern border of Scotland. Usually squadrons would carry out their annual requirement of participating in one live weapons drop in the US, but the recent squeezing of USAF’s budget meant the mission was postponed and it was felt to be more cost efficient to carry it out in the UK.

The location was chosen in negotiation with the Ministry of Defence.

According to USAF, dummy bombs had been dropped in the UK several years ago for practice, but never live munitions of such magnitude.

The live bombs were dropped on a large rock in the ocean, away from the population. Laser guided bombs were used to add “assurance to the accuracy of where the bomb is hitting”, according to a USAF spokesman.

Six aircraft were scheduled to fly up to the site in the morning and another six in the afternoon, each aircraft carrying two live bombs.

Master Sgt Shawn Osbourn, 492nd FS Weapons section chief, said: “We knew about the mission approximately six weeks prior to the operation. We started working with munitions control, in which they built all munitions and were then responsible for loading them.

“GBU-12s are a good choice because of their laser accuracy. The laser is spot-on and can be easily directed, compared to dummy bombs which are free falling.”

With these particular munitions, once the live GBU-12 is dropped, the weapon enters into terminal guidance, falling from the sky on its own course. With 10 seconds remaining in time of flight, the laser is turned on and then spotted on the projected target. The bomb contains a seeker and is able to guide itself to the designated point.

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7 comments

  • I guess you mean Britain

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    Stuart Pozzi

    Sunday, March 2, 2014

  • I wonder whether the local population and fishermen were told about it in advance? We are still waiting for a USAF explanation as to why live ammunition was being used in the low-flying helicopter exercise at Cley.

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    blue tractor

    Friday, February 28, 2014

  • Oh dear they missed Alex Salmond.

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    Tina

    Friday, February 28, 2014

  • nibburz, if this is about the defence of England, they should drop the bombs in England.

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    Claire McNab

    Monday, March 3, 2014

  • I would have thought that the defence of England would come first, how else could they be ready without live practice, I think its greenies talking

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    nibburz

    Friday, February 28, 2014

  • why is this news the raf and usaf have used this rock for target practice since ww2 its a mod range and perfectly safe

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    townie

    Friday, February 28, 2014

  • Not happy - apart from the destruction of habitats, what would be the result if one of these bomb laden craft crashed on the mainland? Why do they need to practise with live munitions anyway. Much as I like the USAF personnel as people I wish they'd take their weapons home where they would have responsibility for being the target of all the enemies they make.

    Report this comment

    Thoreauwasright

    Friday, February 28, 2014

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