Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 6°C

min temp: 1°C

ESTD 1874 Search

Suffolk: Concerns raised over number of heart attack patients receiving timely treatment

17:28 10 January 2013

Dr Alan Murray, chair of Suffolk

Dr Alan Murray, chair of Suffolk's Health Scrutiny Committee

Archant

ONE in four emergency heart attack patients from east Suffolk are not receiving potentially life-saving specialist care within the nationally recommended time, new figures have revealed.

shares

Experts today shared their concerns as 26% of 168 patients suffering serious heart attacks between April 2011 and March last year failed to receive potentially life-saving treatment to unblock their arteries in the time recognised as giving people the best chances.

The figures – the result of a pathway introduced following a shake-up of emergency care in the region – are set to be debated at Suffolk’s Health Scrutiny Meeting next Thursday.

The guidelines state patients should reach a PPCI (primary percutaneous coronary intervention) centre and receive angioplasty treatment within two-and-a-half hours of the initial call.

The procedure involves inserting a deflated balloon through blood vessels to the site of the blockage in the heart.

At the blockage the balloon is inflated to allow blood to flow through again. A stent can then be inserted to permanently open the artery.

In May 2009 controversial new plans introduced by the East of England Specialised Commissioning Group, meant patients requiring angioplasty would be treated in one of three PPCI (primary percutaneous coronary intervention) centres in East Anglia – at Papworth Hospital, the Norfolk and Norwich and Basildon.

Following a pilot of journey times ordered by heart tsar Professor Roger Boyle, following an outcry from patients in east Suffolk, a new PPCI pathway for patients from east Suffolk started in April 2011.

Alan Murray, chair of the scrutiny committee said the figures “on the face of it do give cause for concern”.

Dr Murray said he has requested more information from NHS Suffolk before next Thursday’s meeting.

“Having received the information scrutiny are very interested in the significant percentage of patients who are not reaching a PPCI centre for treatment within 150 minutes.

“I have asked NHS Suffolk for more information both absolute timings and the particular distances patients are being asked to travel.

“I am also keen to see comparisons with other rural areas with the same geography.

“It maybe that there is a cause for concern on the face of these figures.”

Central Suffolk and North Ipswich MP Dr Dan Poulter said problems with ambulance response times in rural parts of east Suffolk are “without doubt” a contributing factor.

He said: “There is absolutely no doubt ambulance response times in some parts of rural east Suffolk are unacceptable.

“It is not the fact the paramedics don’t want to get to patients but the fact that senior managers have chosen not to put resources in those rural areas.

“Time when someone is suffering a heart attack is of the essence. The more time taken to receive treatment the lesser the patient’s chances of recovery.”

A spokesman for NHS Suffolk said: “The 150 minute call to balloon time is not a maximum time limit. Patient outcome is more important than call to balloon time. During the trial period Professor Roger Boyle concluded that although journey times from east Suffolk were longer than the average across the east of England, mortality was comparable with the east of England as a whole.

“There has been a rigorous and attentive audit scrutinised by doctors from Ipswich and the Heart Attack Centres. There is no evidence of worse outcome.”

In 2010 Professor Boyle recommended that while patients needing emergency care should still be sent to one of the regional centres those requiring elective care should be treated in a new PCI centre at Ipswich Hospital.

Last February the funding was secured for the new centre to be built at Heath Road. The first patients are expected to be treated at the centre later this year.

shares

3 comments

  • I live 54 miles from Papworth Hospital and 53 miles from Basildon Hospital. Allowing for an 18 minute (hopefully) response time for a paramedic to arrive, stabilise me and get on the road to either location, it is going to be very close to getting me there within 150 minutes. If the A14 is blocked (like today) or the same on the A12 , patients from my area are going to be at risk. (Yes, I do donate to the air ambulance charity each month)

    Report this comment

    The original Victor Meldrew

    Thursday, January 10, 2013

  • The East of England and also needs to make sure it's medical reading is up to date: Many young people who have strokes at an early age often turn out to have Hughes Syndrome: Antiphopholipid Syndrome: http:www.telegraph.co.ukhealth4400796Hughes-Syndrome-simple-to-treat-but-all-too-often-ignored.html

    Report this comment

    eastern parts

    Friday, January 11, 2013

  • Dr Dan said problems with ambulance response times in rural Suffolk are "without doubt" a contributing factor and are unacceptable. So we reward the outgoing CEO of the East of England Ambulance Service with a knighthood for his services. Right...........

    Report this comment

    Tolly

    Thursday, January 10, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

Former Met police officer Colin Sutton with his dog Jasper

Many might describe Colin Sutton as a ‘proper copper’ - the sort with blue blood running through his family’s veins.

Mick McCarthy, Manager of Ipswich Town shouts instructions Bristol City v Ipswich Town

Ipswich Town boss Mick McCarthy says he is as frustrated and agitated as supporters after this afternoon’s 2-1 defeat at relegation-battling Bristol City made it four losses from five games in all competitions.

The Belstead House in Pinweood, Ipswich.

Frustrated councillors who object to plans to build 155 homes in their parish are threatening legal action against planners.

Fire crews free trapped horse. Library image.

Three fire crews helped to release a horse trapped inside a horse box this afternoon.

Terry Brown stands next to a sign he erected to urge BT to take action

A Finningham man has claimed his father “could have died” after BT left his elderly parents without signal for a fortnight.

Southwold

A Suffolk GP surgery has been rated as Outstanding following an inspection by the Care Quality Commission.

A file picture of Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service.

Firefighters were called to a home in Springfield Road in the early hours.

Most read

Fred Olsen Travel Sale

cover

Click here to view
the Fred Olsen
Travel Sale

View

Most commented

HOT JOBS

Show Job Lists

Topic pages

Streetlife

Great British Life

Great British Life
MyDate24 MyPhotos24