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Suffolk/Essex: Oxfam report shows poorest households now pay more

09:39 22 April 2014

Some of the poorest households in Suffolk and Essex are paying at least £20 extra a week because of the so-called bedroom tax, a national charity has warned today.

Some of the poorest households in Suffolk and Essex are paying at least £20 extra a week because of the so-called bedroom tax, a national charity has warned today.

Archant

Some of the poorest households in Suffolk and Essex are paying at least £20 extra a week because of the so called ‘bedroom tax’, a national charity has warned today.

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The report by Oxfam and the New Police Institute (NPI), titled ‘Multiple Cuts For The Poorest Families’, shows that around 2,600 of the poorest households in Suffolk are on average £14.50 a week worse off. Around 400 are being hit by at least £20 per week.

Around 4,000 of the poorest households in Essex are being hit by the bedroom tax; on average they are £16.40 per week worse off.

Renters in the private sector have seen their housing benefit cut too by the Local Housing Allowance. In Suffolk 4,700 households have been affected, and 7,000 households in Essex have been affected too. Households in Essex are losing around £8.20 a week.

There are also widespread cuts to council tax benefits.

In the UK, some 300,000 households have seen a cut in housing benefit, 920,000 have seen a cut in council tax support and 480,000 have seen a cut in both.

Mark Goldring, Oxfam Chief Executive, said: “This is the latest evidence of a perfect storm blowing massive holes in the safety net which is supposed to stop people falling further into poverty.

We are already seeing people turning to food banks and struggling with rent, council tax, childcare and travel costs to job centres.

“At a time when the five richest families in the UK have the same wealth as the bottom 20 percent of the population it is unacceptable that the poorest are paying such a heavy price.”

Tom MacInnes, Research Director at NPI and report author said: “There are two parts to the safety net. One is the means-tested cash benefit such as jobseeker’s allowance, which is rising by less than prices. The other is the benefits that help pay for specific unavoidable costs. This is where cuts have been targeted and where the greatest damage to the safety net is being done.”

The so-called bedroom tax reduces peoples’ housing benefit depending on how many spare bedrooms are in the household.

The charity has called on the Government to determine what the absolute minimum level of support should be for households in different circumstances.

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3 comments

  • Funny but we never got H.Benefit top up back in the 70's. Perhaps that's why many young couples rented rooms on the top floor of often elderly ladies who had lost husbands, houses. Then you were lucky to rent a terrace, with a coal fire, outside loo, no bathroom and in our case no hot water heater. I came from a home where dad worked Sunday's to pay the mortgage, on a 2 bedroom house. I shared with sibling until I left home, in an unheated bedroom, coal fire down stairs. Council homes were for married couples and there was a points system. Now we knock two into one and people can have as many children as they like, married or not..how times change!!!

    Report this comment

    waspie

    Tuesday, April 22, 2014

  • Cameron a 'Christian' ?, "Do unto others that which you wish done unto you" !!

    Report this comment

    freedomf

    Tuesday, April 22, 2014

  • In principle there is nothing wrong with the new policy. The problem arises when public housing is not available to allow people to move to avoid the increases. The present government with their policies of selling public housing for short term political advantage have much to answer for.

    Report this comment

    amsterdam81

    Tuesday, April 22, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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