Suffolk: Mental health boss rejects crisis claims

Gary Page, Chairman of the Norfolk and Suffolk NHS foundation Trust Gary Page, Chairman of the Norfolk and Suffolk NHS foundation Trust

Saturday, December 28, 2013
9:00 AM

As a new campaign is launched against changes to mental health services in the region, the chairman of the NHS Trust which serves Suffolk and Norfolk has denied his organisation is in crisis.

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Campaigners launch Christmas salvo

Campaigners aiming to highlight fears over changes to mental health services in East Anglia have launched a “12 Cuts of Christmas” campaign, each day featuring a different client’s story about how changes have affected them.

The “Campaign to Save Mental Health Services in Norfolk and Suffolk” says it is backed by workers at the Trust, clients, and others interested in services across the region.

The Campaign was launched in November at an open meeting attended by about 300 people which passed a vote of no confidence in the management of the Trust.

Protesters attended a meeting at Bury St Edmunds just before Christmas at which non-executive director Graham Creelman said: “Whichever political party is in power, it helps them to continue squeezing funding for the health service, so the pressure would appear to be on the providers to constantly improve.

“We should be constantly improving our quality, but we really need to understand that we’re working in an envelope that is unsustainable for the future without upping pay.

“We must be constantly questioning our efficiency, but this is a developing national crisis in mental health.”

However Mr Page, speaking exclusively to the EADT, dismissed claims about a crisis at the Trust.

He said: “These are challenging times. We have more demand for our services and the government is making less money available to us. So we are having to change the way we operate.

“But I reject claims that the Trust is in chaos. We recently had an inspection from the CQC at Woodlands in Ipswich and that found that the work was of a high quality and that morale among the staff was high – that is not the hallmark of a crisis in the organisation.”

However Gary Page did accept that some of the changes introduced by the Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust had caused unforeseen problems – and were being partially reversed.

Overall, however, it was vital that the Trust changed the way it operated to take account of reduced funding and an increased demand on its services – it is facing a budget reduction of £40 million by 2016.

Mr Page said: “Unlike NHS acute services, our budget is not linked to the number of people demanding our services.

“As a result we are seeing an increased demand for our services at the same time as our budget is being cut. That means we have to look at new ways of providing services.”

He said the Trust had been faced with two options – cut some of its services because of lack of money, or redesigning the way it operates with the aim of maintaining services.

It had chosen the latter, but during the changes fresh issues had become clear.

Mr Page said: “There was a reduction in the number of staff. Much of this was through not replacing those who left.

The number of administrative staff was reduced in particular.

“However that meant that front line clinical and support staff ended up doing more administrative tasks which is not the best use of their talents so we are taking on some more administrators to help there.”

Campaigners have warned that the changes have led to long-term clients of mental health services seeing a reduction in their services – or a change in their support workers.

Mr Page recognised there had been changes, and said the Trust recognised it was in everyone’s interests that clients should be able to develop a long-term relationship with their support workers.

He said: “We know it is important that clients should be able to build trust with their support workers and we want to enable that to happen. There have been changes, but this is a clear priority for us.”

Although there had been changes to the way the Trust worked with some of its clients, there had been not increase in the number of “crisis” events that had required instant action by the Trust.

Crisis events come when a client has a sudden breakdown which often involves intervention by acute health services, often in hospital casualty departments, or the police.

Mr Page said: “We have increased the psychiatric cover in accident and emergency departments to deal with people brought in with mental health problems.” The Trust was also working with the police to improve cover.

And there were other services that the Trust was able to boost – for people with autism and those suffering from eating disorders.

Although there has been concern about the number of bed closures, Mr Page said that overall the number of beds available had not changed.

And Mr Page warned that the Trust’s services would be needed by many people: “One in three people are likely to suffer from mental health problems at some stage in life – that is a very significant figure.”

8 comments

  • Totally agree. I have never been so degraded, to have been debanded after a twenty minute interview. ( after being a very experienced practitioner)

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    Mrs. Miggins

    Wednesday, January 1, 2014

  • Not at all sure about the mention of autism in this article. Autism is a handicap not an illness. I hope for the sake of everyone affected by both that the NHS and the reporters here know and understand the difference.

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    Just Me

    Saturday, December 28, 2013

  • TERENCE MANNING

    Saturday, December 28, 2013

  • i will try and relax and not go mental [ big time crisis]

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    TERENCE MANNING

    Saturday, December 28, 2013

  • Mental Health Boss rejects crisis claims...... No, really? That is their job isn't it? They have no real idea what is going on, on the shop floor, a natural filtration system of supervisors and managers up the chain of command to have only the good news reaching him

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    equalibrium

    Saturday, December 28, 2013

  • Not in Crisis? Has he spoke to front line staff? Some secretaries are working for 10 doctors where they used to work flat out for between 1 and 3. Staff are so exhausted they are leaving their jobs, even without the security of having another job to go to. Staff are worn out, not sleeping or are suffering work related stress. For full timers it is relentless, day in, day out with far too much work and pressure and not enough time. For those of us working like this, it is offensive for Mr page to sit in his big office and say that services are not crisis. How would he know

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    Mrs Wobbly Bits

    Saturday, December 28, 2013

  • Totally agree with Mrs.Wobbly bits. Hoping we will have a better 2014. Some of us will be leaving. At least we have lovely workers on the ground to support us.

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    Mrs. Miggins

    Wednesday, January 1, 2014

  • Of course it's in crisis. Reduction in admin stafff led to clinical staff doing more admin..... Wow there is a surprise ! Couldn't possibly have seen that coming could you !! so you make lots of people redundant, at vast expense then have to recruit. Appalling management of the service. You let people with vast experience go at vast redundancy expense only to recruit again. There should be an independant investigation into the mis management of this trust which in my opinion has wasted millions of pounds of public money

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    Andy

    Saturday, December 28, 2013

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