HER crimes made her an icon of evil.

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And prison documents, which include a final psychological assessment made in the months before her death, contain chilling accounts of how she felt about the Moors murders.

Her interviewer states that although she believed Brady to have initiated the offences her attitude towards involvement shifted from “one of fear to one of a willing participant who enjoyed the feelings of affinity with Mr Brady which involvement in the offences afforded her”.

Hindley also suggests she recognises her own culpability by stating: “... although by the end I had become as corrupt as Ian was, there is a distiction ... I did not instigate ... but I knew the difference between right and wrong ... I didn’t have a compulsion to kill ... I wasn’t in charge ... but in some ways I was more culpable because I knew better.”

The document states that Hindley wanted to make clear that she was never at the scene of the murders and her involvement was “luring the children away.”

She added: “I feel more responsible than Brady...I procured the children...I did not commit the murders but I was responsible.”

The document reports that Hindley was “extremely tearful” as she stated “I’ve affected so many people” and went on to say that coverage of the Soham murders in August 2002 had brought back “painful memories”.

She added: “I can see how the public perceive my offences since the Cambridge offences.”

During the interviews Hindley’s lack of mobility is also noted with the claim that her ability to “engage in direct physically aggressive acts” is reduced.

Hindley, who was described in other documents at the time as “generally cheerful” and even “houseproud”, appeared to be content with ‘unofficial segregation’ in her single room at Highpoint.

She states: “I would like to stay here...peace of mind...good staff...appreciation of mum’s needs...told may move to Foston Hall (in Derbyshire)...I do not want to go there...too far for visits....prefer to stay here at Highpoint.”

She added: “I’ve made my funeral arrangements for here in case I die in prison.”

But Hindley still hoped she would be released from prison to spend time with her family, despite what she admitted was “the real threat of assassination.”

She added: “I would like to work with old people...know I can’t work with children...but love children...would like to be of some help to older people.”

1 comment

  • What about Winnie Johnson?! She never knew where they left her son. If there is judgement I hope Winnie had her day when she passed over last year.

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    D A

    Friday, January 4, 2013

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