Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 18°C

min temp: 12°C

ESTD 1874 Search

WIN A NEW HYUNDAI i10 - See the EADT on June 8 for full details

West Suffolk: Hospital recruits 40 Portuguese nurses

09:00 24 January 2013

Nichole Day (executive chief nurse)

Nichole Day (executive chief nurse)

Archant

A SHORTAGE of registered UK nurses has forced a Suffolk hospital to go on a recruitment drive in Portugal, where there is an “excess” of qualified nurses.

shares

West Suffolk Hospital’s 1,000-strong nursing team – of which just 60% are registered nurses – is set to be boosted by 40 new Portuguese recruits, who will arrive at the hospital in two groups over the next two months.

It is hoped they will help fill existing vacancies and reduce spending on bank and agency staff.

A spokesman said the first of the Portuguese nurses would begin an induction programme in February with the remaining group set to boost the hospital’s busy wards from March.

They are expected to work across all areas of the hospital and will be used to replace bank and agency nurses, and help staff additional capacity that has been opened to manage winter pressures.

The recruits will work alongside West Suffolk’s newly qualified student nurses, all of whom have also been offered jobs.

According to the spokesman, when the hospital was having difficulty finding new recruits, they took advice from a national agency and were told that Portugal had more qualified nurses than it needed. Nursing qualifications in Portugal are also very similar to those in the UK, which makes it easier to register them with the National Medical Council.

Executive chief nurse at the hospital, Nichole Day, said: “Like many other hospitals, we have found it difficult to recruit staff due to a shortage of registered nurses coming through the system.

“We looked to Portugal instead and are delighted that our recruitment drive was such a success. We have recruited 40 very high calibre nurses with excellent communication skills and look forward to welcoming them onto our wards.”

In Portugal, nurses complete a four-year degree course, with the final nine months spent working in an acute hospital. Ms Day continued: “They have excellent care skills and particular expertise in the care of older people, which is ideal for the population we serve. They will also bring new ideas and new experiences to our wards.

“The nurses will be used to staff additional capacity which has been opened to cope with winter pressures.”

shares

4 comments

  • i'll tell you the real problem this country as not put enough money into training our own nurse's and then all they get when they are trained is how awful the NHS is . we need less bloody managers and more nurse's

    Report this comment

    Tinatyping

    Thursday, January 24, 2013

  • There is something very wrong if a hospital needs to recruit Nurses from another country. So EADT can you story dig a bit deeper and find out what the real problem is?

    Report this comment

    Red Robbo

    Thursday, January 24, 2013

  • If 7,000 nurses have been made redundant since the last election (Guardian 231112) why do we need 40 from Portugal?

    Report this comment

    Trinco

    Saturday, January 26, 2013

  • Agree with Red Robbo, something is seriously wrong if one hospital is recruiting in such large numbers. What are working conditions like at West Suffolk Hospital, that they suddenly have so many vacancies? Obviously it is good that they reduce dependency on bank and agency nurses, who cost more and have less commitment to patients. Obviously we shall all welcome the new nurses, but is it really true that Portugal has a lot of unemployed nurses? Are patients there going to suffer, if so many of their nurses flee the country, not just to WSH but no doubt to many other UK hospitals?

    Report this comment

    Boris

    Thursday, January 24, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

The sun shines for the first day of the Suffolk Show 2015.

We are bringing you live updates this morning from Trinity Park as day one of the Suffolk Show gets underway.

Cancer survivor Oliver Rofix, who was saved from a rare and deadly form of leukaemia by a bone marrow donation in 2006, will drive a 1952 Nuffield Tractor from Lands End to John O'Groats in September raising money for Teenage Cancer Trust.

Suffolk cancer survivor Olly Rofix has barely given himself time to dwell on overcoming the disease following a bone marrow transplant in 2006.

Police are investigating the incident

Police are investigating a suspected indecent exposure on a bus in Colchester.

Suffolk Show 2015 
Food hall

Food retailers at the Suffolk Show have insisted the county has a “growing reputation” across the country for its “exceptional” produce.

The sun shines for the first day of the Suffolk Show 2015.

Crowds are gathered around the show rings to see the livestock, show jumpers and sheep dogs in action today.

Rise in sex crimes reported in Essex - stock photo

Essex’s police and crime commissioner has pledged to continue tackling serious sex crimes, as new figures were released showing a significant rise in the number of child rapes reported to Essex Police.

The incident happened on the A12

Work to repair the A12 between Ipswich and the Essex border has been delayed again – meaning motorists will continue to suffer from a 40mph limit well into June.

South East Suffolk Magistrates' Court

A teenager who put a police officer in a headlock while resisting arrest for being drunk and disorderly must pay £480 in fines, costs and compensation.

Bury Busk, part of the Bury St Edmunds Festival.

An annual festival which is an “important part” of Bury St Edmunds’ cultural life saw more tickets sold than the previous year.

Jean Sarah at Klinik Marinus am Stein in Brannenburg

A cancer patient who raised £14,000 for alternative treatment abroad has returned feeling “better than ever”.

Most read

Most commented

Topic pages