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Aged just six months, baby Oscar is already taking centre stage

PUBLISHED: 07:23 20 November 2014 | UPDATED: 07:23 20 November 2014

Six-month-old baby Oscar made his stage debut in Terence Rattigan play Separate Tables, playing five-month-old Vincent Stratton.

Six-month-old baby Oscar made his stage debut in Terence Rattigan play Separate Tables, playing five-month-old Vincent Stratton.

Archant

At just six months old, baby Oscar Martin could well be on his way to stardom.

Having starred in the opening three nights of Terence Rattigan play Separate Tables, the baby from Harleston is already stealing the show, playing five-month-old Vincent Stratton.

His mum, Becky Martin, 25, also stars in the play, as Jean Stratton, Vincent’s mother.

Oscar’s aunt, Emma Martin, who works at the Theatre Royal, Bury St Edmunds, is also in the cast, and his first performances were at Diss Corn Hall on Friday night, The Cut in Halesworth on Saturday night and at the Seagull Theatre, Lowestoft, on Tuesday night.

His mum said: “He seems to be quite natural, and gets a big ‘aah’ when he comes on the stage. He upstages me and Jake Kubala, who plays Charles Stratton, Vincent’s father. Our characters are determined we’re not going to get married and have kids, and it’s a time jump.”

Despite his early start on the stage, he hasn’t become a diva just yet. “He’s quite an easy baby, now and again he does play up though,” Becky said.

“Backstage before we get on he’s happy. If he does anything it will be a test to keep straight faces!”

Oscar’s dad, Gareth Harris, 28, brings him to the venues shortly before his appearance, and takes him home when the scene is over. Oscar’s grandmother, Penelope Martin, is involved in the production too, helping backstage.

His mum added: “It’s a family thing. I’ve always done theatre, and I imagined it would be a part of his life. I was doing plays when I was pregnant with him, so he had already started.

“My sister is determined he’s going to be an actor. All we hear about is Oscar.

“Gareth takes him home afterwards. He’s not very happy on the way home – maybe he wants to be back in the limelight. He could make it to the very top one day – it’d be a nice aim.

“We do a lot with theatre companies and they’re making plans to write him into stories.

“One of the cast said ‘we’ve got an Oscar for the play’.”

In the first of the two one-act plays which go to make up Separate Tables, directed by David Green of Open Space Theatre, the stormy relationship between an ex-MP and his former wife is laid bare as they meet years after their troubled marriage dissolved into acrimony.

The friendship between a shy young woman and a retired Army officer is depicted in the second play, which explores the seedy intolerance of individuals clinging to the strict social and sexual codes of a bygone era.

Oscar has four more performances – at the Fisher Theatre, Bungay on tonight, St Edmunds Hall, Hoxne on Saturday night, Beccles Public Hall on November 26 and Botesdale Village Hall on November 29. Call the venues for tickets.

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