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Gallery: Sudbury Carnival return worth while as procession wows crowds

07:00 25 August 2014

Carnival Queen Darcie Croftor rides on a float in the Sudbury Carnival.

Carnival Queen Darcie Croftor rides on a float in the Sudbury Carnival.

It was all worth while.


Those were the words of the chair of the Sudbury Carnival organising committee, as crowds turned out in the sunshine to see it return for first time in more than 20 years, with a theme of Sudbury through the Ages.

More than 15 processioners, led by a group of 60 ex-majorettes who used to take part in the event, wowed spectators as 19-year-old carnival queen Darcie Crofton, accompanied by princesses Phoebe-Louise Shepherd and Fern Swain, waved to the adoring crowds.

Alongside the former majorettes were the Diamond Lites, who marched and twirled as they made their way round the town with the floats, fancy-dress walkers and motorcyclists.

There was a charity element for the ex-majorettes, who were “marching to beat cancer”, aiming to raise as much money for Macmillan Cancer Support and Cancer Research as they could, with the Cancer Research shop on Market Hill acting as a donation station on the day.

The chairman of the committee, Jack Owen, said: “It was absolutely wonderful. I was amazed at the amount of people who turned up.

“As far as the committee is concerned it’s been a successful day.

“There were no negative voices at all, and my team were second to none.”

There was a turn out as well for AFC Sudbury, as the supporters’ club, decked in their team’s colours walked with scarves and flags through the town.

There was a Hollywood guest too, as Augustus, who played Joey in the film War Horse, was cheered along, as the Sudbury Ephemera Archive portrayed the Suffragettes dressed in the style of the group in 1913 – the same year Emily Davison was killed after she was knocked over the King’s Horse at the Epsom Derby.

The parade made its way from Alexandra Road, continuing along Newton Road and making a loop round the town back to the Delphi sports ground as the fun and games continued long into the evening.

Mr Owen said: “I believe the team I had around me were marvellous and they all pulled their weight.

“It’s all been worth while. It was an excellent day weather-wise, there wasn’t a drop of rain. We couldn’t have asked for better weather.”

Mr Owen also said he had no doubt that the carnival will return next year, saying: “I think people are enthused. Hopefully more people will be interested for next year.

“People have already to offered to help for next year.”


1 comment

  • Perhaps some lessons in the English language could be "worthwhile" for your "Journalists"

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    Tuesday, August 26, 2014

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