Sunny

Sunny

max temp: 20°C

min temp: 6°C

Search
Norfolk Tourism Awards

I started stand-up because I didn’t want to work, now I’m exhausted says comic Jason Byrne ahead of East Anglia gigs

PUBLISHED: 20:05 08 November 2017 | UPDATED: 20:05 08 November 2017

Jason Byrne brings new tour The Man With Three Brains to the region. Photo: Contributed

Jason Byrne brings new tour The Man With Three Brains to the region. Photo: Contributed

Archant

One of the fastest thinking comics around, Jason Byrne is revealing the method behind his madness with new show The Man With Three Brains.

Jason's at  Norwich Playhouse tomorrow, Cambridge Junction November 24 and Southends Palace Theatre December 3. Photo: Steve UllathorneJason's at Norwich Playhouse tomorrow, Cambridge Junction November 24 and Southends Palace Theatre December 3. Photo: Steve Ullathorne

Q: You’re a busy boy - touring The Man With Three Brains, visiting Norwich Playhouse tomorrow, Cambridge Junction November 24 and Southend’s Palace Theatre December 3; new Dave TV show Don’t Say It, Bring It and you’re a judge on Ireland’s Got Talent alongside Louis Walsh, Denise Van Outen and Michelle Visage. How are you fitting everything in...

I’m not (laughs). I may’ve said yes to about three too many things. The other thing we’re trying to fit in is family life as well. My talent will be trying to run my life and hoping I win the thing myself, it’s insane. I always compare us to surgeons; you get a really good one, he or she’s busy forever. That’s what happens with comedians now.

I had an interest in stand-up because I didn’t want to work and had this notion of lying around the flat. That’s how I did do stand-up when I first started. I used to share a flat with another stand-up in Dublin city centre. We walked into town, gigged on a Wednesday and a Friday and then we had money for food rent and drink and that was us. All I can say is I was a richer man when I started doing stand-up than I am now. I’m just exhausted now. I also have to keep fit as well, so I’m running between gigs.

Q: If your wife and two children want to see you they’ll have to audition for Ireland’s Got Talent...

On the day I got that show, I heard the Dave show’s being released and my phone was hopping with congratulations - ‘well done’, other people going ‘that’s brilliant’ - and I got a text from my wife and all she said to me all day was ‘you could have put that bin out as you drove past’ (laughs).

Q: You took the new tour to Edinburgh Fringe Festival where you’ve become a regular fixture...

Twenty-two years there, it’s nothing like Arthur Smith who arrived there in 1962 or something.

Every time I go to do Edinburgh or I go on tour I just go ‘oh my God I hope it’s going to be okay’. Then I realise it’s always okay. People come back because it’s always a good show. I know how to do it now.

I’d do Edinburgh all the time because it’s one venue for four weeks. I don’t have to move my stuff around, I stay in the flat, get a bike, cycle all over the place, I love that. I play football, golf, watch loads of other shows. That’s the way you have to approach that festival.

If you don’t enjoy Edinburgh you’re sitting in your flat, looking out the window, worrying about your show every night; which is what a lot of acts do. You’ve got to embrace Edinburgh and then let it do the work for you; then it’s just a great festival.

Touring, I don’t get to see any other acts or anything else’ there’s just me and my poor tour manager who I torment. Last year I found all the different running tracks around each city, I had great fun. The show’s quite energetic, a lot of people getting up, doing stunts with me and then all the improv, all this thinking on me feet stuff.

Q: The Man With Three Brains is a look at how your mind works during a gig, scanning the audience for improv moments, collating material and stunts and pushing yourself to the limit...

I think it’s a cry for help basically (laughs) because people don’t understand, it’s probably the man with 78million different concerts on the go at the same time... it’s a very very busy head to be inside all the time. On stage I could probably power a small city. If I had to do a table created against me off-stage and me on-stage there’s no way I’d beat the guy on stage, not a chance.

I don’t know what is happening inside that head, but it’s able to open all sorts of doors and go down all sorts of corridors. It’s also being brave and taking a chance with a subject, taking a chance of getting people up onstage and ‘who the hell am I talking to?’ so I’m constantly dealing with complete mayhem. When this Third World War starts I’m going to be a lot of use to people, I’m pretty good at multi-tasking.

Doing a gig for Kim Jong-un would be great.. Imagine him, ‘get me the button, this guy’s saying stuff’. Funnily enough I have a button in my show which sets off Irish dancing music for about seven seconds. I’ve had such fun with that.

I use it for hecklers, I’ve used it in case the atmosphere drops in the room, in case anybody on stage says something that’s not politically correct. It’s basically to wipe people’s memories if something happens. I’d love it if your man there goes to press the button and all he hears is (hums Irish music and laughs).

Q: You’re enjoying the tour...

I don’t look forward to the travelling, that can be quite intense. But the British audiences have always been so good to me and you get on stage and it’s worth the effort. They just want to have a laugh, it’s unbelievable how much people need to have a laugh.

Two of the biggest names in British comedy are bringing their new tours to the town in 2019.

Aspiring actors auditioned in the hope of landing the role of a lifetime alongside Stevi Ritchie and Atomic Kitten’s Natasha Hamilton in this year’s pantomime at the Ipswich Regent.

Could you be the next Snow White?

Saturday, September 22, 2018

Are you the fairest of them all? Auditions for a truly glittering role are taking place on Monday – and producers are looking for a local girl to play the part.

Contemporary dance choreographer James Wilton is renowned for his athletic dance works now DanceEast is staging the premiere of his latest performance The Storm. Arts editor Andrew Clarke spoke to him about mixing spectacle with food for thought

Awful Auntie by David Walliams has been a huge hit in book form with young children since its release in 2014.

As an EastEnders superfan, seriously I haven’t missed an episode since I was eight years old and I’m now 23, when I heard Sid Owen had been cast as Hook I was more excited than Phil Mitchell in a brewery.

The musical Once has proved itself to be a contemporary classic that tells an aspirational story full of tears and laughter. Arts editor Andrew Clarke speaks to director Peter Rowe and the cast as the play opens the New Wolsey’s autumn season

Stately homes, castles, ruins, windmills, gardens and historic boats are all welcoming visitors free of charge for this year’s Heritage Open Days.

The Barton Players are busy rehearsing for their comedy which is being staged next month in the village.

Most read

Show Job Lists

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

MyDate24 MyPhotos24