Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 24°C

min temp: 16°C

Search

Review: The Importance of Being Earnest at Cambridge Arts Theatre is enjoyable and amusing

PUBLISHED: 12:31 11 April 2018 | UPDATED: 12:33 11 April 2018

Thomas Howes, Peter Sandys-Clarke (c) The Other Richard.  Picture: THE OTHER RICHARD

Thomas Howes, Peter Sandys-Clarke (c) The Other Richard. Picture: THE OTHER RICHARD

Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest – at Cambridge Arts Theatre until April 14 – is an enjoyable and amusing production, writes James Marston.

Hannah Louise Howell, Peter Sandys-Clarke 2 (c) James Findlay.  Picture: THE OTHER RICHARDHannah Louise Howell, Peter Sandys-Clarke 2 (c) James Findlay. Picture: THE OTHER RICHARD

A crafted work of words and wit, which remains as funny and as relevant as the day it was written, The Importance of Being Earnest is a classic.

The somewhat whimsical, almost farcical story, that explores themes such as class, identity, family, snobbery and social expectation, the production by the Original Theatre Company makes good use of the Wildean humour, stays faithful to the period and is acted with quality throughout.

Never lacking in pace, the story of the hedonistic Jack Worthing and the “bunburying” Algernon Moncrieff is peppered with memorable “bon mots” from the pen of Wilde.

The imperious Lady Bracknell is played with aplomb and gravitas by Gwen Taylor, of Duty Free and Heartbeat fame, delivering her memorable lines with skill.

Susan Penhaligon (c) The Other Richard.  Picture: THE OTHER RICHARDSusan Penhaligon (c) The Other Richard. Picture: THE OTHER RICHARD

With the backdrop of a stylish set, the pace, energy and tempo is kept throughout as the audience respond to the brilliantly written script. As Earnest becomes Jack and Algernon becomes Earnest, the complications increase as their two young ladies and Lady Bracknell demand explanations.

Throw in the added amusements of the secret drinking governess Prism and the bumbling Canon Chasuble a butler and a maid and Wilde’s clever observation of Victorian society is complete

Directed by Alastair Whatley, this is an entertaining play and a masterpiece of Wildean wordsmithery.

And in the end, of course, all is well.

Gwen Taylor, Louise Coulthard (c) The Other Richard. Picture: THE OTHER RICHARDGwen Taylor, Louise Coulthard (c) The Other Richard. Picture: THE OTHER RICHARD

An enjoyable and amusing production.

Five years after last staging Les Misérables, the Children’s Theatre Company Ipswich return with the French-set drama, this time at the Corn Exchange.

Review of Unseen Enemy: Radar and The Cold War by Suzanne Hawkes

The story of Bawdsey Manor during the Cold War is the story behind a new play by Suzanne Hawkes. Arts Editor Andrew Clarke spoke to her about East Anglia on the front lines.

Rehearsals are in full swing for the 40th anniversary production of the Suffolk Young People’s Theatre.

Harry Hill performed in the comedy tent at this year’s Latitude Festival.

Maria Marten and the Murder in the Red Barn is one of the most enduring parts of Suffolk folklore. It’s a story that has been told, re-told, adapted, sung and staged countless times over the centuries and you would think that there is nothing more to say about this infamous crime. You would be wrong.

HighTide unveils a musical tinged theatre festival this year. Arts editor Andrew Clarke spoke to artistic director Steven Atkinson about the treats in store and discovers a real East Anglian flavour to the work

Sherlock Holmes: The Final Curtain

Maria Marten and the Red Barn has been an important part of Suffolk folklore for the past 200 years but who was the real Maria Marten. Arts Editor Andrew Clarke joined the cast of Eastern Angles summer show Polstead to find out

Most read

Show Job Lists

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

MyDate24 MyPhotos24