Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 16°C

min temp: 12°C

Search

Suffolk magician Matt Edwards ‘overwhelmed by love and support’ after Britain’s Got Talent success

PUBLISHED: 20:37 16 May 2017 | UPDATED: 16:32 17 May 2017

Matt Edwards on Britain's Got Talent. Picture: TOM DYMOND/SYCO/THAMES ITV

Matt Edwards on Britain's Got Talent. Picture: TOM DYMOND/SYCO/THAMES ITV

A Suffolk entertainer who has risen to fame after appearing on Britain’s Got Talent has hailed his wife his “biggest inspiration” and told how he has dedicated his life to magic.

Matt Edwards, 34, stole the show on Saturday night with a wacky routine, which impressed presenters Ant and Dec so much that they pressed the coveted golden buzzer, sending him straight through to the semi-finals.

Speaking to this newspaper, Matt said the reaction he had received since the programme aired had been “crazy”.

He added: “I have had so many messages on Facebook, Twitter, text and email.

“The love and support I have had has been incredible, it’s been better than I thought it would be.

Matt Edwards after Ant and Dec pressed the golden buzzer on Britain's Got Talent. Picture: TOM DYMOND/SYCO/THAMES ITV Matt Edwards after Ant and Dec pressed the golden buzzer on Britain's Got Talent. Picture: TOM DYMOND/SYCO/THAMES ITV

“It seems that the whole world has reached out to me. I have been so overwhelmed.

“It’s what I wanted but it’s hard to believe in yourself sometimes and to see so many people get behind you and say ‘go on boy’ has been amazing.”

He has since been named one of the favourites to win the show.

Growing up in Needham Market, Matt took up magic at the age of five and got his first “professional gig” at 14, performing tricks for diners at a restaurant in Ipswich.

His father, Alan, would wait for him at the bar every Friday and Saturday night until he finished his shift, then take him home.

Matt said: “It was one of the makings of me.”

At 16 Matt moved to Spain where he worked for 10 years on and off as a magician at his friend’s bar, The House of Illusion.

With his foot in the door, Matt then met and was able to work alongside his “favourite magician”, Wayne Dobson, who he now calls a friend.

But Matt said he wouldn’t be where he is today without the support of his wife, Kat.

“She is one of my biggest inspirations, she is my hero really,” added Matt, who now lives in Hereford.

“For her to stand by me and watch me fly all over the place trying to make it big, she couldn’t be more supportive. I just want to keep a smile on her face.”

If Matt makes it to the final of Britain’s Got Talent, he said he had a “special” act up his sleeve, which will “make you say wow”.

However, Matt said even if he doesn’t get past the next round, he will continue to work in magic.

“From this point onwards I don’t really mind what happens, I love my job so much and I know I will do it forever,” he added. “I‘m just trying to enjoy it while I’ve got it. Of course I would love to win, but if I don’t I’m still having fun now.”

On Monday, Matt was on the ITV show, This Morning.

The Crucible, by playwright Arthur Miller, is one of the great masterworks on modern theatre. As David Henshall discovers, The Crucible is more than a historical drama it’s a perceptive examination of how communities function and how petty jealousies can tear them apart.

Rural touring champions Common Ground theatre company love to give Dickens a new spin. Arts editor Andrew Clarke spoke to writer-actor-directors Julian Harries and Pat Whymark about the joy of bringing their favourite author to the stage

Suffolk legends and folklore always make great theatre. Wonderful Beast are staging a new production of Return of the Wildman and taking it out on tour. Arts Editor Andrew Clarke spoke to director Alys Kihl and writer Thea Smiley about this innovative play.

In an adaption by acclaimed playwright Jessica Swale, who has had huge recent West End success with Nell Gwyn starring Gemma Arterton, Gallery Players present Thomas Hardy’s classic Victorian novel of love, pride and class with a charismatic, flawed female character at its centre.

Ipswich dancer Harry Clark returns home this weekend to perform with Scottish dance Theatre at the Jerwood DanceHouse. Arts editor Andrew Clarke spoke to him

Oxy and the Morons, by Paul Sirett, Mike Peters and Steve Allan Jones, New Wolsey Theatre, until October 21

From Co-Op Juniors productions and Linda Shipton’s School of Dancing to the Royal Ballet the professional dancer has come a long way. Now she is back with the latest tour by Rambert Dance Company.

The New Wolsey Theatre has a reputation for putting lots of great music in their shows. But, as Arts editor Andrew Clarke, discovers with Oxy and the Morons they are looking at whether the punk spirit can survive into middle age.

When foreign language plays are translated for the stage they usually end up as starchy period pieces with cut-glass accents. Arts editor Andrew Clarke spoke to writer Blake Morrison about making the classics much more egalitarian.

Most read

Eating Out in the Broads

cover

Click here to view
the Eating Out
supplement

View

Visit the Broads

cover

Click here to view
the Visit the Broads
supplement

View

Show Job Lists

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter
MyDate24 MyPhotos24