Sunny

Sunny

max temp: 11°C

min temp: 5°C

Search

Cider is ‘tastiest for a decade’ after bumper apple harvest

PUBLISHED: 16:27 10 October 2018 | UPDATED: 16:38 10 October 2018

Apple pressing at the Harleston Cider Company, based at Palgrave. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Apple pressing at the Harleston Cider Company, based at Palgrave. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Archant

A bumper autumn apple harvest has blessed East Anglian cider with its best taste for a decade, according to drinks producers.

Ken Woolley pressing apples at the Harleston Cider Company, based at Palgrave. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYKen Woolley pressing apples at the Harleston Cider Company, based at Palgrave. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Cider makers are celebrating a near-perfect growing season, with no frosts to kill off apple blossoms before pollination, and the hot weather between June and August increasing flavours in the apples – and consequently in cider.

Harleston Cider Co sources and presses apples from within 10 to 15 miles of its base at Palgrave, near Diss, and ferments the extracted juice using the natural yeast and sugars in the fruit.

Master cider maker Ken Woolley said the summer heatwave had made this year’s apples juicier and sweeter than usual.

“I have been making cider for ten years, and this is certainly the best year for flavour,” he said. “You can tell just by tasting it.

“There is more complexity in the cider, and there are some floral notes and some tropical fruits in there. The yield [of apple juice] is nearly 70pc this year, and it is usually 60pc, so the apples are much juicier.

“And the hot summer has increased the natural sugars in the apples, which are 10pc up this year, so that also increases the flavour.”

Mr Woolley said while commercial apples in orchards would have been irrigated to keep them growing throughout the extended dry spell, wild apples and fruit from people’s gardens are noticeably smaller this year.

He said the cidery used 10-15 different varieties of apples, including some donated by customers.

“To have the diversity in the cider we like to have lots of different apples,” he said. “A number of people have donated apples this year, in exchange for cider, and we have also bought in apples from local, commercial orchards.

“The company has carried out four pressings to date using about eight tonnes of fruit.”

The family firm produces four still ciders, an ice cider, and a spicy “fire cider” vinegar.

It produced an award-winning perry in 2016 and this year the bumper harvest, including some wild perry pears from near the cidery, has prompted the production of a new product, Palgrave Perry.

Search hundreds of local jobs at Jobs24

0 comments

Welcome , please leave your message below.

Optional - JPG files only
Optional - MP3 files only
Optional - 3GP, AVI, MOV, MPG or WMV files
Comments

Please log in to leave a comment and share your views with other East Anglian Daily Times visitors.

We enable people to post comments with the aim of encouraging open debate.

Only people who register and sign up to our terms and conditions can post comments. These terms and conditions explain our house rules and legal guidelines.

Comments are not edited by East Anglian Daily Times staff prior to publication but may be automatically filtered.

If you have a complaint about a comment please contact us by clicking on the Report This Comment button next to the comment.

Not a member yet?

Register to create your own unique East Anglian Daily Times account for free.

Signing up is free, quick and easy and offers you the chance to add comments, personalise the site with local information picked just for you, and more.

Sign up now

Two Suffolk engineering consultancy businesses have teamed up in a strategic alliance that expands the services they can offer to clients in the eastern region.

East of England Co-op Funeral Services has won the Outstanding Dementia Care Innovation category in the National Dementia Care Awards 2018.

TV naturalist Chris Packham has called on energy bosses to “work harder” to avoid building a massive substation in a “beautiful” Suffolk habitat.

Are plans to build a huge substation in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty setting a dangerous precedent? Sheena Grant speaks to campaigners fighting to protect the Suffolk Sandlings.

European freight specialists, Jordon, has been named as a finalist in the 2018 British International Freight Association Freight Service Awards.

Management Jobs

Show Job Lists

Most read

Topic pages

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

MyDate24 MyPhotos24