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Baker revives bread loaves made from ancient grains

PUBLISHED: 15:13 31 October 2019 | UPDATED: 15:13 31 October 2019

Susan Hudson, who is holding a baking workshop at Kenton Hall  Picture: WILLIAM HUDSON

Susan Hudson, who is holding a baking workshop at Kenton Hall Picture: WILLIAM HUDSON

William Hudson

A baker is set to show how flour made from grains sourced from ancient varieties - which have been revived in Suffolk - can be turned into bread.

Susan Hudson, who is holding a baking workshop at Kenton Hall  Picture: WILLIAM HUDSONSusan Hudson, who is holding a baking workshop at Kenton Hall Picture: WILLIAM HUDSON

Sue Hudson is running two workshops - entitled Ancient Grains - Mill Your Own - which will create loaves using unusual flours such as Emmer, Rye, Maluka, Spelt and Khorasian corn.

She will also be using YQ Population wheat, which was pioneered by the late Professor Martin Wolfe, who grew the wheat at his test farm at Wakelyns Agroforestry at Fressingfield, near Eye.

MORE - Tributes paid to 'inspirational' agricultural innovator who created test farm in Suffolk

It was a very diverse population of wheat, which suited to organic and low-input farming systems, and is now being grown at Home Farm Nacton, near Ipswich.

Sue, who works as a tutor with The Food Hub, a cookery school at Kenton Hall Estate, near Debenham, will also show how you can mill your own flour.

"Many other countries consider fresh flour makes the best bread rather than ordinary bagged flour - in Austria and Germany you will find a tabletop flour mill in many kitchens," she said.

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"Freshly milled wholegrain flour contains the essential nutrients in the germ of the grain. The most nutritious and delicious bread is to be made using freshly milled wholegrain flour."

She was lucky to be able to use some of the famous Wakelyns Population wheat, she said.

YQ stands for Yield and Quality, and the wheat is organic and locally grown, with no chemical inputs.

"Unlike contemporary methods of growing wheat with a single variety, YQ is a diverse crop that has emerged over time from a wide range of carefully chosen parent plants, resulting in fields full of genetically different wheat plants," she explained.

"YQ is much better able to cope with climatic variability and more resistant to disease and over time gives more consistent yields. YQ Population wheat flour makes excellent bread, wonderful biscuits - and melt-in-the-mouth pastry."

The first of the workshops takes place on Saturday, November 2, and a further course is scheduled for January 19, 2020, in Norwich.

Visit www.breadworkshops.co.uk for more information, or email info@breadworkshops.co.uk



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