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LOOK: Stunning nature photographs go on show

PUBLISHED: 07:00 09 June 2019

Mason Bee Hotel - Rob Coleman

Mason Bee Hotel - Rob Coleman

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A photography exhibition has opened in Suffolk featuring images and words showing the value of nature in East Anglia.

Flyby - Tom Wake
 A familiar view of the Deben estuary is transformed with the introduction of a swooping barn owl.
Looking on this chance encounter, captured by Tom whilst out running, we can instantly see the source of enjoyment.
Likewise, we are greeted with a stark realisation that without the owl, the image would be incomplete.
Biodiversity brings joyFlyby - Tom Wake A familiar view of the Deben estuary is transformed with the introduction of a swooping barn owl. Looking on this chance encounter, captured by Tom whilst out running, we can instantly see the source of enjoyment. Likewise, we are greeted with a stark realisation that without the owl, the image would be incomplete. Biodiversity brings joy

The collection is made up of pictures submitted by photographers who entered a competition run by The Suffolk Pioneer Project, an initiative set up by government with the aim of improving the state of the natural environment within a generation.

"Entrants were asked to meet the challenge of conveying the value of nature through one image," said Suffolk Pioneer manager Peter Cosgrove.

"The environment has degraded as a consequence of people taking it for granted. The theory goes, that if we can see and discuss the value of nature, we can better inform the choices and decisions we take."

Trade you a haircut? - Robyn Bartlett 
Such a simple message had to be applauded when dealing with such a complex subject.
The quizzical expression on the sheep’s face says she is still weighing up whether or not to make the deal.Trade you a haircut? - Robyn Bartlett Such a simple message had to be applauded when dealing with such a complex subject. The quizzical expression on the sheep’s face says she is still weighing up whether or not to make the deal.

He added: "The Pioneer wanted to understand what the value of nature is to the people of East Anglia and to start a conversation on it."

The exhibition of winning and highly commended images along with captions went on show at the Longshed in Woodbridge this Saturday and runs until Wednesday June 12 before the exhibition moves to Ipswich County library from June 17th.

Game Keeper’s Dog - Andrew Bailey 
The innocence expressed through the eyes of this young spaniel is juxtaposed with the game bird hanging from his mouth.This image shows us natural provisions, but it isn’t the just a potential meal in the dog’s mouth we should be focussing on.
The loyalty of the spaniel garnered through years of investment building bonds between man and beast shows the true value of what the natural world can offer if we focus on the longer term rather than immediate reward.Game Keeper’s Dog - Andrew Bailey The innocence expressed through the eyes of this young spaniel is juxtaposed with the game bird hanging from his mouth.This image shows us natural provisions, but it isn’t the just a potential meal in the dog’s mouth we should be focussing on. The loyalty of the spaniel garnered through years of investment building bonds between man and beast shows the true value of what the natural world can offer if we focus on the longer term rather than immediate reward.

Southwold Storm � Ben Green 
Southwold pier extends seaward to hint at the opportunity on offer in the North Sea but this is masked all by the mirk kicked up by the approaching storm.
Ben Green has captured the power and physicality of this storm, the waves and tides all in one picture.
Though value might not be immediately evident, the viewer is lured in to wonder what lies beneath? The ocean is often undervalued because so much is out of sight, out of mind.
Ben�s image helps to shift this by demonstrating so many processes at once.Southwold Storm � Ben Green Southwold pier extends seaward to hint at the opportunity on offer in the North Sea but this is masked all by the mirk kicked up by the approaching storm. Ben Green has captured the power and physicality of this storm, the waves and tides all in one picture. Though value might not be immediately evident, the viewer is lured in to wonder what lies beneath? The ocean is often undervalued because so much is out of sight, out of mind. Ben�s image helps to shift this by demonstrating so many processes at once.

Nature’s Recycling Centre by Rob Coleman
When walking through the woods, we often look up at the trees as being the most significant structures there. In reality the fungi beneath our feet are the real stars as they work tirelessly to balance forest ecosystems by recycling nutrients for other organisms.Nature’s Recycling Centre by Rob Coleman When walking through the woods, we often look up at the trees as being the most significant structures there. In reality the fungi beneath our feet are the real stars as they work tirelessly to balance forest ecosystems by recycling nutrients for other organisms.

Frozen Marsh - Andrew Bailey
It appears time has frozen alongside the saltmarsh in this image. Time is so important when considering natural processes. The tranquillity of this picture implies everything has stopped, yet the marsh continues
delivering value undeterred. Coastal protection, carbon storage and waste management processes continue resolute and unabated. Andrew’s image offers us an opportunity to contemplate these services, that so
often go unnoticed.Frozen Marsh - Andrew Bailey It appears time has frozen alongside the saltmarsh in this image. Time is so important when considering natural processes. The tranquillity of this picture implies everything has stopped, yet the marsh continues delivering value undeterred. Coastal protection, carbon storage and waste management processes continue resolute and unabated. Andrew’s image offers us an opportunity to contemplate these services, that so often go unnoticed.

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