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Suffolk students awarded for tech expertise

PUBLISHED: 15:45 09 July 2018 | UPDATED: 15:45 09 July 2018

Dr Jessica Barker (Redacted firm), Alice Gilman Earle and unknown. Picture: Teamtech photographers

Dr Jessica Barker (Redacted firm), Alice Gilman Earle and unknown. Picture: Teamtech photographers

Archant

Students from a school in Woodbridge are headed to Buckingham Palace in October to meet the Duke of York, after scooping two top prizes in this year’s teen tech awards.

Dallas Campbell (Science and Technology reporter), with Teen tech award winners Tristan Whittle, Joash Jennis and Harry Lansley. Picture: TeenTech photographersDallas Campbell (Science and Technology reporter), with Teen tech award winners Tristan Whittle, Joash Jennis and Harry Lansley. Picture: TeenTech photographers

The TeenTech Awards are a chance for UK students from 11-16 and 16-19, working in teams of up to three, to look at problems large and small and see if they can find a better way of doing things.

Joash Jennish 12, Tristan Whittle 13, and Harry Lansley, 13, from Farlingaye School on Ransom Road, Woodbridge, were winners in the environmental category for their prototype for a pollution fighting drone. And after liaising with experts from the world of app creation, 13 year-old Alice Gilman-Earle won the fashion award for her fashion advice app.

The winning year eight and nine students were from ‘Endeavour’, a group of students at Farlingaye selected for their academic capability and attitude to learning.

Tristan said his team learned lots of new skills in programming and designing their drone. “It was great fun meeting all the judges and presenting our idea,” he added.

Dallas Campbell (Science and Technology reporter), Tristan Whittle, Joash Jennis & Harry Lansley. Picture: Teamtech photographerDallas Campbell (Science and Technology reporter), Tristan Whittle, Joash Jennis & Harry Lansley. Picture: Teamtech photographer

The boys’ team, who produced a 3D print of their drone, were mentored by a former environmental researcher, Dr Steventon Barnes.

“She was the perfect person to help us to define what a pollutant is, what level of pollution you find in cities compared to in the countryside, and in what time of year,” explained Mr Hawtin.

But Endeavour’s lead co-ordinator Barry Hawtin said it was the children themselves who researched, developed and designed solutions to problems posed.

“The boys looked at how they could clean up pollution in cities, and devised a plan for very small drones to fly out autonomously and analyse data. They had to think about what times they needed to be there.”

The headteacher of Farlingaye High School, Dr Andrew Sievewright, said he was “delighted” that his students participated so enthusiastically and successfully in the awards.

“We are always looking for ways to enable students to develop the skills and capabilities required for success in a rapidly-changing world, and this competition has provided an excellent opportunity for them to do this,” he said.


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