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Don't waste a milkshake on politicians...

PUBLISHED: 20:00 30 May 2019 | UPDATED: 13:41 03 June 2019

Nigel Farage after he was doused in milkshake during a campaign walkabout in Newcastleon May 20. Picture: Tom Wilkinson/PA Wire

Nigel Farage after he was doused in milkshake during a campaign walkabout in Newcastleon May 20. Picture: Tom Wilkinson/PA Wire

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The missile of choice may have changed but protesters have been throwing things at politicians for millennia. Here are some of the incidents over the course of 2,000 years.

2001 picture of then Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott, covered in egg, in Rhyl, North Wales. Picture: PA/Dave Kendall2001 picture of then Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott, covered in egg, in Rhyl, North Wales. Picture: PA/Dave Kendall

On the election trail for his Brexit Party, Nigel Farage was "milkshaked".

Since when did a milkshake become the missile of choice when demonstrating that you do not agree with or approve of someone's views?

It used to be eggs, didn't it, and rotten tomatoes, although dairy has long been a popular choice with pantomimes, where custard or cream is usually the inoffensive weapon of choice for slapstick scenes.

Someone getting a "custard pie" in the face always gets a laugh... on stage.

A world record custard pie fight in Colchester in 2009. Picture: Yui Mok/PA Wire
 

EADTA world record custard pie fight in Colchester in 2009. Picture: Yui Mok/PA Wire EADT

When it's not funny, it can be mob mentality. For example, when petty criminals were either put in the stocks or pilloried, the locals would gather to throw some scraps of vegetation at them.

But a milkshake? That costs money.

It was in Newcastle that Mr Farage was milkshaked and the person who took responsibilty/credit for throwing the beverage told the media it was a banana and caramel shake that cost £5.25 that he felt moved to hurl at the Brexit Party leader.

The milkshake has only recently become the missile of choice.

North Walsham Mayor Richard Sims in the stocks in 2015 to raise money for Norfolk First Responders by getting pelted with wet sponges. 

Picture: MARK BULLIMORENorth Walsham Mayor Richard Sims in the stocks in 2015 to raise money for Norfolk First Responders by getting pelted with wet sponges. Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

A video of former English Defence League leader Tommy Robinson having a milkshake thrown over him went viral and it seems to be this incident that started the trend. It appears to have inspired others to protest in the same manner.

Ukip's South West MEP candidate Carl Benjamin has been the target of a number of attempted milkshakings. It was Mr Benjamin, you may recall, who made dreadful comments about Labour MP Jess Phillips.

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It has been widely reported that while McDonald's in Edinburgh stopped selling milkshakes to prevent a repeat performance at a nearby Brexit rally in the city, Burger King cheerfully announced it would be continuing to sell the drink.

Vespasian leads his forces in this illuminated manuscript from 1470. Picture: Wikimedia CommonsVespasian leads his forces in this illuminated manuscript from 1470. Picture: Wikimedia Commons

Before milkshakes, it was eggs... more often aimed at Labour politicians. Current Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was hit by an egg in March, former party leader Ed Miliband was egged on in both London (2013) and Southampton (2012), and so was former Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott, who was splattered by egg in 2001.

Over the pond, former Governor of Alaska Sarah Palin was almost hit by two tomatoes, while at a book signing in Minnesota in 2009, Vermont governor Jim Douglas was hit with a cream pie thrown by a man dressed in a Santa Claus costume at a Fourth of July parade in Vermont, in 2008. Meanwhile the conservative commentator Pat Buchanan was covered in salad dressing (I have no information as to whether it was French, Caesar or blue cheese) after giving a speech in 2005. There was a pie in the face for former Green Party presidential candidate Ralph Nader in 2003.

In the first fruit-based incident of recent times, President Nicolas Maduro of Venezuela was hit on the head by a Mango in 2015.

Not the first such incident but a very early one was in the first century when Vespasian, later Roman emperor, had turnips hurled at him.

Tomatoes were lobbed at former Governor of Alaska, Sarah Palin (seen here casting her vote). Picture: AP Photo/Ted S. WarrenTomatoes were lobbed at former Governor of Alaska, Sarah Palin (seen here casting her vote). Picture: AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

So far we have only looked at missiles that might be considered one of your "five a day" or "as seen on Masterchef". Foodstuffs appeared to be preferred as projectiles when politicians are involved but there are exceptions

In America in 2012, Mitt Romney, at the time a Republican presidential candidate, had glitter thrown at him. Glitter bombing is often used on politicians who are against same-sex marriage.

In 2009, Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi was in Milan when he was hit with a toy statue of a cathedral. The Victorian British politician Viscount Castlereagh had a dead cat thrown at him when he was out canvassing and George W Bush was the subject of a "shoeing" in 2008, when an Iraqi journalist threw both of his shoes at the US president. Bush ducked and avoided being hit by either of the shoes.

Launching food attacks may be understandable, but they are not excusable and my attention has been drawn to the fact that the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) last year received 50 complaints about a scene in Peter Rabbit where the rabbits pelt another character with fruit.

President George W Bush ducks a shoe thrown at him during a news conference in Baghdad in 2008.  Picture: AP/APTN)President George W Bush ducks a shoe thrown at him during a news conference in Baghdad in 2008. Picture: AP/APTN)

The BBFC said the complaints were largely connected to a protest by anti-allergy campaigners. Its report said: "The scene in question … [is] part of an ongoing battle between the rabbits and the owner of a vegetable garden. The pelting with fruit is simply one of the ploys the rabbits use in order to overcome their nemesis.

It's best not to throw things at all.

- Source: https://mashable.com

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