Anger at asylum seeker deportation

MORE than 40 demonstrators packed a Suffolk police station last nightto protest after an asylum seeker described as "an asset to the community" was told he would be deported.

MORE than 40 demonstrators packed a Suffolk police station last nightto protest after an asylum seeker described as "an asset to the community" was told he would be deported.

Protestors of all races, colours and creeds joined to voice their support for Anvar Valiyev, who has lived in the UK since applying for asylum in 2001.

The 25-year-old, who comes from Uzbekistan, works in Ipswich for national charity CSV Media, where he helps train and educate underprivileged members of the community.

But last night, with tears running down their faces, his friends told the EADT how Mr Valiyev was told by immigration officers yesterdayhe would be deported - with no prior warning.


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They claim he had gone to Ipswich police station to sign on as an asylum seeker - a monthly requirement - only to be told his final appeal had failed and he was taken into custody on the spot.

Standing in the foyer of the police station, Bruce MacGregor, regional manager for CSV media, said: "We are very upset and disappointed by this because Anvar has contributed greatly to our project and to the local community as a whole.

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"He started with us as a volunteer, working 12 hours a day, and he has proved himself to be a very able guy - he is technically brilliant.

"Anvar has become a very important asset to the community and the town. We wanted to come down here to show our support for him and see if we could make a difference."

In recent months, Mr Valiyev has been a vital part of a CSV project aimed at warning all parts of the community about the dangers of drugs, particularly crack cocaine.

"It was an honour and a privilege for us to be able to employ him," Mr MacGregor added. "This is an outrage - the town is going to be poorer because of it.

"We've got highly skilled young people who volunteer to work in the community and the government want to get rid of them. It's very short-sighted."

Dalu Moloantoa, a South African who has worked with Mr Valiyev for a year, said: "Anvar is always willing to help us and he's always got a smile for everyone.

"This is quite a shock and I think it's very unfair. If there was a problem then he should have been told."

Mr Valiyev was taken to Harwich Detention Centre last night, where he will await deportation.

A spokesman for the Home Office said: "We don't comment on the details of individual asylum cases.

"People who have had their asylum request turned down and their appeals exhausted are expected to leave the country.

"If they do not do so, they may be detained until they can be removed."

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