Anti nukes make new tablet plea

AN ANTI-NUCLEAR group has renewed calls for the distribution of anti-radiation tablets over a much wider radius of the Sizewell nuclear site after learning that they have been issued to every resident in the Irish Republic.

AN ANTI-NUCLEAR group has renewed calls for the distribution of anti-radiation tablets over a much wider radius of the Sizewell nuclear site after learning that they have been issued to every resident in the Irish Republic.

Potassium iodatetablets, which help prevent the absorption of radioactivity into the human body, were issued last year to people living and working within a 1.5 mile radius of the nuclear site.

The extent of the distribution zone was criticised at the time by the Shut Down Sizewell campaign which staged a protest outside the venue where tablets were being issued.

However, the group has now learned that the whole population of the Irish Republic has been issued with the tablets for use in the event of a nuclear disaster in the UK.


You may also want to watch:


Each household in the Republic has been posted a packet of six of the tablets - sufficient to provide a single dose for each member of an average-sized family.

Households requiring extra supplies can obtain them through local health centres.

Most Read

The Shut Down Sizewell Campaign said yesterday it believes local authorities in this country should follow the Irish example.

"For a start the population of East Anglia needs to have the tablets for use in the event of a major accident at Sizewell and then it should be extended to the whole country," said Charles Barnett, the group's chairman.

Local authorities within a nine-mile radius of the Oldbury nuclear power station in Gloucester were currently considering extending the emergency zone and pre-distributing potassium iodate tablets, he said.

Mr Barnett criticised Dr Amanda Jones, director of the Suffolk Coastal NHS Primary Care Trust, for not voicing any concern that the 1.5 mile distribution zone around Sizewell was inadequate.

But Dr Jones said that although she had been aware of the Irish Republic's decision, advice of the extent of emergency zones and pre-distribution of potassium iodate tablets had come from national bodies.

"We have done what was suggested by these bodies - they decide the extent of the population which may be at risk.

"You have to draw a line somewhere and those who have the expertise in this sort of thing have drawn it," she added.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter