Bikers take to the road for charity

A SLEEPY Sunday morning was shaken by the "awesome" sight of 140 Harley-Davidson bikers as they rumbled through the tranquil Suffolk countryside.The bikers from the Fenlanders Harley-Davidson chapter met in Glemsford, near Sudbury, yesterday and then headed for Great Ormond Street Hospital in London – for which they were raising money.

A SLEEPY Sunday morning was shaken by the "awesome" sight of 140 Harley-Davidson bikers as they rumbled through the tranquil Suffolk countryside.

The bikers from the Fenlanders Harley-Davidson chapter met in Glemsford, near Sudbury, yesterday and then headed for Great Ormond Street Hospital in London – for which they were raising money.

Lead biker Roger Stearn was keen to point out their tough and uncompromising image was unjustified. As part of the world's biggest motorcycle club Harley owners in fact raise millions for charity, he said.

"As a chapter we choose to support the East Anglian Children's hospice," said Mr Stearn.


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He added: "With all that gleaming chrome it was an awesome sight. We rode in a staggered formation so we only take up one lane. On the main roads there will be two riders side by side along a mile and half long convoy.

"We all love the chance to do something like this because of the spectacle and we love to show off and if we can raise money that's great."

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The funds raised from the rally will go towards a new and unique Department of Childhood Nutrition, which builds on the existing expertise at the world famous children's hospital.

Organiser, Professor Alan Lucas of Great Ormond Street Hospital and a member of the Fenlander's chapter, said: "Nutrition is of great importance in the care of children and can often influence their recovery from serious illnesses. In fact, nutrition in early life is one of the most important influences on long-term health, making a major difference to the risk later in life of serious health conditions like heart attacks and diabetes.

"This facility is a very important step and will help stimulate much-needed development of the speciality of childhood nutrition in the UK and abroad, it will help train doctors in this area and most importantly will help improve the standard of nutritional care of children in hospital and in the community. I believe parents will welcome this development."

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