Blues manager Joe's top tunes

AS Ipswich Town's chances of reaching the play-offs ebb away, a touch of music therapy may be the way forward for disappointed manager Joe Royle.What better way to unwind than by listening to his top 10 favourite songs of all time?Royle will discuss his chosen tunes on BBC Radio Suffolk on Monday, May 5 as a guest of presenter Stephen Foster.

AS Ipswich Town's chances of reaching the play-offs ebb away, a touch of music therapy may be the way forward for disappointed manager Joe Royle.

What better way to unwind than by listening to his top 10 favourite songs of all time?

Royle will discuss his chosen tunes on BBC Radio Suffolk on Monday, May 5 as a guest of presenter Stephen Foster.

The special programme "By Royle Appointment" will give an insight into the eclectic music tastes of the Town manager, ranging from The Eagles, to Van Halen, Oasis and The Verve.


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It would seem Royle is more of a rocker than his predecessor George Burley who revealed a penchant for the softer tones of Ronan Keating, Atomic Kitten and Madonna.

The Royle winner is the 1970s classic hit and ultimate break up song Go Your Own Way, by Fleetwood Mac.

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The passionate and furious song, written by Lindsey Buckingham, shows a man plagued by feelings of anger, hurt and disbelief.

In a sneak preview of the show, released to the East Anglian Daily Times, Royle reveals that, as a manager, he empathises with the song's message.

"You have to go your own way at times as a manager," he said. "Everybody seems to think they know your job better than you and we accept that.

"But sometimes you have to be strong, stand tall and go your own way because that's your job and that's what you are paid for."

In at number two is the gritty Roll With It, from the more contemporary British band Oasis.

Royle's bag of tunes is a real mix, with Lorraine Ellison at number three and the powerful 1960s soul torch anthem Stay With Me (baby) .

The most moving song in Royle's top ten is the Verve's classic The Drugs Don't Work, which the manager revealed reminds him of his late father, a former professional musician.

"He died last Christmas at the age of 82," said Joe. "He had a great life and I had a great relationship with him which got better as I got older – we were very close and he was a fantastic father.

"I liked the Verve record when I first heard it and, on listening closely to the lyrics it's about (songwriter) Richard Ashcroft's father dying, I believe.

"It became rather poignant when my own father was dying and I played it a lot in the car. Now, if I haven't thought of him for 48 hours I put it on – it's very sad when you listen to it."

The sounds of the 70s were represented by the less well-known Stand Tall, from Burton Cummings at number six and Our Love (remix), from the soulful Californian vocalist Michael McDonald, formerly of the Doobie Brothers, in eighth place.

Royle said the clutch were the songs that came to him when he was put on the spot, rather than a lasting top 10.

He added: "This is my top ten choice of the moment but my musical choice changes week by week."

He also said he enjoyed some of the music in the charts today, including Coldplay with the beautiful album A Rush of Blood to the Head, released last summer.

He added: "Music has always played an important part in my life. It helps me to relax away from football. It is great to take time out and listen to some music that brings back memories. "Particularly as these days I am clocking up lots of miles in my car listening to CDs between Ipswich and my home in the North West."

But Royle said that the pre-match music in Ipswich's dressing room before games is not quite to his taste.

"It's rap and it's terrible," he added. "They say that when you get older you don't like the new generation of music and it's certainly not for me I'm afraid.

"Jermaine Wright seems to be the DJ and if he takes it up professionally, I won't be going to see him."

Stephen Foster, of BBC Radio Suffolk, said: "Joe's tastes are certainly very eclectic ranging from anything from heavy rock to soul classic. He even managed to come up with a record I'd never heard before, the Cummings ballad Stand Tall. I think that really sums him up and what he has done, certainly over the past few weeks and months, keeping the side together as all around him is looking pretty insecure.

"I certainly got the feeling that he really missed his father, who was a big influence on him. Some of what he said was very touching."

Listeners are invited to tune in to BBC Radio Suffolk to hear Royle's selections and why they mean so much to him from 1-2pm on May 5.

THE ROYLE TOP TEN

1 – Fleetwood Mac, Go Your Own Way

2 – Oasis, Roll With It

3 – Lorraine Ellison, Stay With Me (baby)

4 – The Verve, The Drugs Don't Work

5 – Van Halen, Jump

6 – Burton Cummings, Stand Tall

7 – Eagles, New Kid In Town

8 – Michael McDonald, Our Love (remix)

9 – George Michael, Father Figure

10 – Ike & Tina Turner, River Deep - Mountain High

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