BNP leader speaks at Suffolk rally

THE leader of the controversial British National Party has spoken at a rally in Suffolk in a bid to recruit support for the far-right group, it has emerged.

THE leader of the controversial British National Party has spoken at a rally in Suffolk in a bid to recruit support for the far-right group, it has emerged.

Suffolk-raised Nick Griffin addressed 34 of the party faithful in Rushmere St Andrew village hall, in semi-rural Humber Doucy Lane this week.

Mr Griffin said: "It was good for a first formal meeting of Ipswich BNP. I spoke, we had a question and answer session and a collection – just a normal meeting really.

"We are growing as a party across the whole country in the run up to the European elections, where we will be standing for the England East seat among others.


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"We reckon that we will easily get enough votes in Hertfordshire and Essex to win a seat, but we need to work hard in Suffolk and Norfolk to make sure we don't lose out."

The hall was booked under the guise of a "war games society" who told caretakers they planned to play board games.

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Mr Griffin accepted that may have been the case, but explained it was to avoid any problems in securing a venue.

He added: "We do have problems booking halls, and it's an awful lot of hassle taking councils to court because they won't give us our democratic rights.

"It was local people at the event – it's understandable that our local political opponents don't like new kids on the block."

Mr Griffin also confirmed that he hopes to see BNP meetings held every two months in the Ipswich area.

BNP spokesman Dr Phill Edwards added: "We had members from Woodbridge, Yoxford and Bury St Edmunds, but the majority were from Ipswich.

"We're not disruptive, racist or fascist. The general public know it's a load of rubbish.

"We've got nothing to hide. We don't like to blab because the Anti-Nazi League come along and cause trouble - we don't want rent-a-mob turning up."

Sam Budu, chairman of the Ipswich Racial Equality Council, said the BNP had full legal rights to meet in the town.

But he said he was "concerned" about the party's true motives for stepping up its Suffolk presence.

He said: "They come on the bandwagon of real issues, but what comes after the real issues?

"I don't think the people of Suffolk will welcome them if they come with racist or discriminatory views."

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