Brave teenager to write life story

A BRAVE teenager recovering after a life-saving bone marrow transplant has started writing about her experiences in an autobiography. Luisa Docherty is at home with her family again after spending months in hospital following the treatment to combat her leukaemia.

A BRAVE teenager recovering after a life-saving bone marrow transplant has started writing about her experiences in an autobiography.

Luisa Docherty is at home with her family again after spending months in hospital following the treatment to combat her leukaemia.

The 16-year-old from Dovercourt was diagnosed with life threatening acute lymphobastic leukaemia in 2002 after complaining of headaches and earaches.

After being given the all-clear the cancer returned and doctors then told Luisa and her parents, Toni and Chris, the best treatment would be to have a bone marrow transplant.


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After a match was found she underwent an operation in January and then remained in a specialist unit at the hospital in Bristol as she recovered.

Mrs Docherty revealed her daughter's blood group had changed and now matched that of the bone marrow donor.

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She said: “She is doing well - she is still on a few drugs and has to go to hospital for check-ups each week, but she is still very tired.

“The autobiography is going well, she did quite a lot when she was in Bristol and has done a little bit more since she came home, what she has done is very good, it really makes you want to read on.”

Despite her age she has been able to begin driving lessons as she is registered disabled and is also hoping to return to Ipswich High School for Girls on August 31.

She wants to embark on Year 11 at school, which was ruled out due to ill health last year, and take her GCSEs as she aims to become a doctor.

After Luisa fell ill again last year, a special donor clinic was arranged in Dovercourt in an attempt to find a suitable bone marrow match.

And although the community event did not find a match, the session helped to raise awareness of the teenager's condition and the problems faced by others desperately trying to find a donor.

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