Bromeswell: British Larder recognised for its commitment to local produce in latest edition of Sawday’s Special Places Pubs and Inns of England & Wales

David Hancock, Editor of Alastair Sawdays Pubs and Inns of England and Wales presented owners of th

David Hancock, Editor of Alastair Sawdays Pubs and Inns of England and Wales presented owners of the British Larder Pub Ross Pike and Madalene Bonvini-Hamel the books local seasonal and organic produce award. - Credit: Archant

A celebrated eaterie has been given another accolade in recognition of its commitment to local, seasonal and organic produce.

The British Larder in Bromeswell, near Woodbridge, has received an award in the latest edition of Sawday’s Special Places Pubs and Inns of England & Wales.

The eaterie, run by Madalene Bonvini-Hamel and Ross Pike, has been highlighted for its passion in actively sourcing seasonal foods from high-quality local suppliers and having menus promoting regional produce.

Its entry in the guide reads: “Keen to give her recipe blog a physical base, Madalene has transformed a swirly-carpeted pub into a British Larder – come and taste the food. Her philosophy is based on seasonal ingredients sourced from in and around Suffolk, and that includes ales from Adnams and ciders from Aspall.

“The exciting daily menu brims with creativity and beauty, from Dingley Dell pork and Orford John Dory to Mr Atkinson’s roasted squash. Note the exquisite local game-tasting board (venison scotch eggs, rabbit rillettes, partridge and prune sausages) and the puds (quince filo tarts, gooseberry fools).

“A wood-burner and tongue and groove panelling in the bar, chunky tables in the dining room, a garden for fine weather…this place has seasons covered.”

Mr Pike said the recognition was very pleasing as their whole ethos was based around using fresh, local produce.

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Nearly 1,000 outlets are featured in Sawday’s latest edition, with just 12 selected for an award in four categories; authenticity, commitment to the community, local, seasonal and organic produce or pubs with rooms.

Editor David Hancock said the British Larder was now firmly on the culinary map.