Brothers reunited after 80 years

TWO brothers have been reunited nearly 80 years after the older boy was told his younger brother had died.Norman Fox, 82, of Dovercourt, met his big brother, Frederick, 87, for the first time earlier this month.

TWO brothers have been reunited nearly 80 years after the older boy was told his younger brother had died.

Norman Fox, 82, of Dovercourt, met his big brother, Frederick, 87, for the first time earlier this month.

Frederick was told by their mother when he was five years old that little Norman had died after falling out of his bed and cracking his head. Actually, their mother gave up Norman and he spent his childhood as a Barnado's boy.

Shortly afterwards she also gave up Frederick to National Children's Homes, or Waifs and Strays as it was known then.


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Norman said he had no idea he had a brother and spent his life thinking he was on his own. But Frederick's daughter discovered Norman was alive while researching the family's history.

The pair were reunited on June 11, when Frederick, who lives in Manchester, travelled to Dovercourt to meet his little brother.

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“I was over the moon. There were tears in my eyes. Barnardo's never told me I had any brothers and sisters. He says we are not going to lose contact anymore,” said Norman, reliving the reunion.

Norman said he and his brothers look alike but otherwise they do not have much in common. He spent a lot of his childhood in hospital and did not go to school, whereas Frederick was educated.

Their other brothers and sisters are now dead.

He only saw his mother about four times. Once when he was about ten years old, he asked her about his father. “She smacked me about the face and said: 'Don't you dare talk about him'.”

The family research has revealed their father only saw his mother occasionally. His mother was a railway porter for 30 years.

Norman is currently in hospital, battling MRSA and leg ulcers. He hopes to have a family reunion when he returns home, so his four remaining children can meet their uncle for the first time.

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