Bury St Edmunds: A paranormal investigation team is preparing to use “scientific methods” to look for ghostly beings at Britain’s smallest pub

Leigha Knights (left) and Gemma Apps are going to be investigating the Nutshell pub in Bury for ghos

Leigha Knights (left) and Gemma Apps are going to be investigating the Nutshell pub in Bury for ghosts. - Credit: Archant

A paranormal investigation team is preparing to use “scientific methods” to look for ghostly beings at Britain’s smallest pub, The Nutshell, in Bury St Edmunds.

The duo, Gemma Apps and Leigha Knights, formed their group earlier this month and hope to find evidence of several ghoulish stories surrounding the Cornhill-based pub.

The miniature pub is rumoured to be home to the ghost of a young boy who died there when it was being used as a house. It is also home to a mummified cat.

Leigha, 25, who lives in Bury, said: “I have been going to the pub since I was 18 and I am friends with the manager Jack.

“We got talking about how we had set up this investigation team, and he knew what I was going to ask him and he very kindly allowed us to do it.

“We are the first people to do it in eight years. I come from a long line of very spiritual people and I have wanted to set up an investigation team for some time.”

Gemma, 29, explained the methods behind their planned investigation, which will take place on October 30.

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She said: “Even though we are both very spiritual people, we will be using scientific methods.”

The pair will use an instrument known as a PSB7 Spirit Box, which scans radio waves and they also have a camera equipped with night vision.

The building is thought to date from the early 19th century when it was probably built as an afterthought tucked on the end of a row of more established buildings. It was first listed as pub in 1869.

The rumoured ghost of the small boy, who was believed to have drowned in a bath, has reportedly been seen on the staircase or in an upstairs room.

The pub also has a mummified cat, which was refuted to have been found during the demolition of a nearby 17th century building. The cat is believed to be 300 years old.

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