Airline hails transatlantic success

AN airline operator offering cheap business class transatlantic flights is set to expand its offering to include a Washington route following the success of its Stansted to New York service.

AN airline operator offering cheap business class transatlantic flights is set to expand its offering to include a Washington route following the success of its Stansted to New York service.

Privately-owned Maxjet Airways, whose headquarters are at Dulles in Washington, has only been flying out of Stansted Airport into New York since November of last year.

But the American company already feels confident enough that the demand is out there to lease a second Boeing 767 200-ER for the new route, and says it has already sold more than 10,000 advance tickets for the service, which starts on March 17.

Passengers on the New York flight fly from as little as £854 return including taxes, and travel in comfort in deep reclining leather seats.


You may also want to watch:


All 202 seats are business class, and passengers get the same service throughout the plane.

Passengers get to wait in business class lounges, and perks include a pre-departure drink, multi-course meals, a chef's pantry, complimentary drinks and portable on-demand entertainment.

Most Read

Maxjet is offering an introductory fare of £599 return and everyday return fares for the Washington flights start at £999.

The New York flights, which the company says are around 50% to 75% cheaper than the competition, appear to have gone down well with the travelling public on both sides of the Atlantic, with a 50/50 split, and flights usually well over 50% full.

Maxjet's chief executive Gary Rogliano said their formula for success was based on a “very simple” business model, and the New York flights were going “very well”.

“There is huge demand for all-business-class service at great value,” he said, adding that it was their intention to continue with the cheaper rates.

“It's not a come-on to put people on the plane and raise the price,” he said. “We do one single service across the whole plane. Everyone gets the same thing.”

If the Washington Dulles International Airport service, which is set to operate on Sundays, Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, is successful, the next flights the company may consider would be flights to Boston, or a second New York flight to give more choice.

“I would not call it a gamble having seen the success of the JFK route,” said Mr Rogliano. “I have no reason not to expect success.”

Mark Pendlington, director of communications at BAA Stansted, pointed out key areas of London such as Canary Wharf were in easy reach for the airline's business passengers, who, because of the off-peak arrival times, could be through the airport system within quarter of an hour, and in London in about 45 to 50 minutes. This compared very well with Heathrow, where that time could be more than doubled.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus