Region has UK's lowest pay rises

THE average pay rise in East Anglia last year was the lowest for any region in the UK, according to a survey published yesterday. The 2010 National Management Salary Survey, published by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and XpertHR, recorded an average salary increase for the region of just 1.2%.

THE average pay rise in East Anglia last year was the lowest for any region in the UK, according to a survey published yesterday.

The 2010 National Management Salary Survey, published by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and XpertHR, recorded an average salary increase for the region of just 1.2%, less than half the national average of 2.5%

In cash terms, the findings show an average salary of �20,389 for junior staff across East Anglia and �39,694 for those at team leader level.

At the other end of the pay scale, senior function heads in East Anglia earn an average of �75,988 which also puts the region in bottom place, 41% below London.


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Despite a tough jobs market amid rising unemployment, the survey found that the resignation rate increased from 4.5% to 4.7%, implying that employers are failing to persuade staff to stay.

Asked for the reason behind the desire to change jobs, more than half the employers questioned (53.8%) admitted that restructuring and job insecurity caused many of their staff to “jump ship”. More than a third (38.5%) recognised that their “failure to offer career opportunities and training”.

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Rob Bennett, East Anglian regional manager for the CMI, said: “A year ago employers were looking at job transfers as a way of halting growth of the dole queue. However, with the latest figures showing that staff are prepared to run the risk of unemployment by jumping ship, questions must be asked about employee engagement levels in organisations up and down the country.

“It is clearly time for business to grow up. We can no longer afford to reward people with pay rise after pay rise especially as all the evidence suggests that money isn't the main motivator anymore.

“Instead, employers must concentrate on building remuneration packages that incorporate earnings with development opportunities, offer flexible approaches to work and recognition of the need to better engage with staff.”

Another unexpected result, with unemployment currently at 2.47million, was that many employers are struggling to recruit staff. According to the data, 46% of employers cannot fill vacancies, with the majority (77%) citing a lack of specialist skills amongst candidates, although one quarter (24%) blame the salaries they are able to offer.

Mark Crail, head of salary surveys and HR benchmarking at XpertHR, said: “With many companies having frozen salaries in 2009 and inflation on the increase in 2010, employers face mounting pressure to raise pay in the coming months.”

With economic recovery still weak, employers needed to be able to manage employee expectations about what was realistic, he added.

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