Stansted reduces carbon footprint

STANSTED Airport has become the first airport in the world to be invited by aircraft manufacturer Boeing to examine ways of reducing the environmental impacts of aviation.

STANSTED Airport has become the first airport in the world to be invited by aircraft manufacturer Boeing to examine ways of reducing the environmental impacts of aviation.

A team of experts from Stansted took part in groundbreaking trials at Boeing's Seattle headquarters to look at redesigning a system used to connect parked aircraft to the mains electrical supply.

Parked aircraft are plugged into fixed electrical ground power (FEGP) units that provide a silent source of electrical power so pilots can use lights and air conditioning while planes are stationary and preparing to depart.

On some occasions the plug used to attach the aircraft to the power supply can fall out, resulting in the aircraft having to use a generator - increasing both noise and emissions.


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The Stansted team spent the three day workshop trialling and testing full size mock-ups of new-style connection points and a final design was presented to Boeing's top bosses.

Andy Jefferson, BAA environment manager, said: “I am really excited by this work. It's a great start and shows me what potential we have to make significant improvements in the environmental impact of Stansted Airport through collaborative efforts across the aviation industry.

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“Stansted Airport continually strives to look at all opportunities and innovations that help strike a balance between the social and economic benefits of aviation and its environmental impacts to ensure sustainable growth in the future is really possible.”

Jeanne Yu, Boeing's director for environmental performance, adde: “This initiative marks an increasing collaboration between Boeing and the UK's largest airport company. It is a significant example of lateral thinking and innovation applied to the whole global Boeing 737 aircraft family through a retrofit that will benefit the environment through further reducing community noise and emissions.”

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