Suffolk and Essex migratory habits revealed in new report

A new report has looked into the nation's internal migration statistics

A new report has looked into the nation's internal migration statistics - Credit: Sarah Lucy brown

Stark differences in the region’s migratory habits have been revealed by a new report looking at population moves within the UK.

60 people moved from Suffolk Coastal to Leeds

60 people moved from Suffolk Coastal to Leeds - Credit: Archant

The report, which analyses data from a range of sources to track where people moved over the course of a year, has highlighted areas of growth and decline in the region as well as some unusual connections with other parts of the UK.

Overall, the report shows that more people are moving to Suffolk and north Essex from within the rest of the UK than are departing, with 59,990 new arrivals compared with 54,310 people leaving, creating a net growth of 5,680 over the 12 months, between July 2013 and June 2014.

At a district level, however, there are significant differences in the net variations, with some undertaking major growth while others have declined.

Ipswich and St Edmundsbury were the only two districts to experience a net loss through internal migration, with Suffolk’s county town undergoing the greatest reduction of 460.

The ONS report contrasts sharply with a previous Centre for Cities report, which indicated Ipswich’s population had grown by 13,500 (11%) between 2004-2013 – the joint eighth fastest rate in the UK.

Economist Paul Swinney, who worked on the report, said the growth rate in Ipswich had slowed to just 200 by 2013, which might explain the following year’s decline in the ONS report. The Centre for Cities report, unlike the ONS, included international migration and births and deaths in its figures, which could also explain the differences, he added.

Table showing international migration statistics

Table showing international migration statistics - Credit: Archant

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A spokesman for Ipswich Borough Council said: “We will be studying these figures in detail and comparing them with other research data.

“Ipswich is a regional economic centre and attracts a larger working population from outside the borough so its daytime population is larger than other towns that cannot offer the level of job and skills opportunities.”

At the other end of the scale, Tendring saw the greatest overall growth, with a net surplus of 1,700.

Nigel Brown, Tendring District Council’s communications manager, said it is the fifth most popular retirement destination in the country, which will have an impact on the figures.

“On top of that it has the lowest average property price in Essex – as well as being the Essex Sunshine Coast – so it is not surprising that people want to move to the area,” he added. “There is no one reason for it and it is probably down to a whole combination of factors.”

While the majority of moves within Suffolk and Essex are between nearby districts, the study has also revealed some interesting connections with communities further afield.

180 people moved from Colchester to Scotland over the year

180 people moved from Colchester to Scotland over the year - Credit: Archant

A significant number of people from all over the region choose to relocate to Scotland and Cornwall, while many of those leaving Colchester, in particular, moved to boroughs in London.

Many of those arriving in the region from outside East Anglia came from districts in Kent, the study shows, with Nottingham and Brighton also featuring significantly.

Nationally more people are moving between areas with an estimated 2.85 million people leaving their district to go to another, an increase of 5% compared to 2013.

Allan Findlay, professor of population geography at the University of St Andrews, said that could be explained by an improvement in the economy, adding: “A slow down in the housing market and the recession held things back for a few years but now things are returning to how they were before, so internal migration is increasing.”

Young adults were the most likely to relocate, reflecting moves to start higher education.

Babergh

Babergh’s internal migration figures showed strong links with its neighbouring districts, though with more arrivals from Essex compared with those leaving, who tended to remain in Suffolk.

Of Babergh’s new arrivals, Ipswich (750), Braintree (490) and Colchester(480) were the most frequent districts of origin.

Whereas for those departing, Ipswich (750), Mid Suffolk (390) and St Edmundsbury (340) were the most popular destinations.

For those leaving East Anglia, Scotland (60) was the most popular destination, followed by Brighton and Hove and Canterbury (40 each).

Canterbury was also the most frequent place of origin, excluding East Anglia for the new arrivals (30). A further 20 each came from Southampton, Wiltshire, Aylesbury Vale and Test Valley in Hampshire.

Overall there were 5,040 new arrivals from within the UK compared with 4,370 departures, creating a net increase of 680.

Braintree

Braintree showed the region’s second highest overall levels of internal migration, with more arrivals and departures from within the UK than any local district other than Colchester.

There were a total of 7,080 new arrivals and 6,770 departures throughout the year, creating a net gain of 310.

The arrivals came mainly from the nearby Essex districts of Chelmsford (1080), Colchester (610) and Uttlesford (450).

Those coming from outside East Anglia came mainly from Kent, with 40 from Canterbury and 30 from Medway. A further 30 came each from Brighton and Hove and Cornwall.

Most people leaving Braintree went to the nearby districts of Colchester (980), Chelmsford (460) and Babergh (490). Those leaving East Anglia headed mainly to Scotland (90) followed by Canterbury (60) and Nottingham (40).

Colchester

Colchester had the region’s highest overall levels of internal migration, with more arrivals and departures from within England than any other district.

A total of 10,210 people moved to the borough over the year in question, with 9,320 leaving, resulting in a net increase of 890.

Of those arriving, most came from nearby districts of Tendring (1,210), Braintree (980) and Chelmsford (470).

Those moving from outside region came mainly from Brighton and Hove (60). Around 40 new arrivals came from each of Nottingham, Medway, Southampton, Cornwall and Wiltshire.

People leaving Colchester mainly went to Tendring (1,250) Braintree (610) and Babergh (480). Those moving beyond the region went chiefly to Scotland (180). Significant numbers also went to the London boroughs of Tower Hamlets (90), Lambeth, Southwark and Wandsworth, each of which received around 80.

Forest Heath

Forest Heath’s internal migration statistics showed stronger links with its westward neighbours in Cambridgeshire than in Suffolk.

The district’s main source of new arrivals was East Cambridgeshire (620), which was also the most popular destination for those leaving Forest Heath (530).

While St Edmundsbury (350), was the second most frequent district of origin for people moving into Forest Heath, the third was South Cambridgeshire (260).

St Edmundsbury was also the second most popular destination for people leaving Forest Heath (370) followed by Breckland in Norfolk (290).

Of those arriving from outside East Anglia, West Berkshire (30) was the most common district of origin.

And for those leaving East Anglia from Forest Heath, Scotland (30) was the most popular destination, followed by Bristol, Cornwall, Wiltshire, Lincoln and Birmingham (all 20).

Overall there were 3,370 new arrivals from within the UK compared with 2,930 departures, creating an overall net growth of 440.

Ipswich

Ipswich saw the region’s largest net reduction through internal migration of 460.

With 6,210 new arrivals compared with 6,670 departures, the borough was one of only two districts to see an overall loss.

Most of those leaving went to the neighbouring districts of Suffolk Coastal (1,540) followed by Mid Suffolk (770) and Babergh (750).

Of those leaving the region altogether, Scotland (60) was the most popular destination followed by Nottingham (40) and Birmingham (40).

Of those arriving, most came from Suffolk Coastal (1,270), Babergh (750) and Mid Suffolk (540). Around 110 also came from Norwich.

Those coming from outside the region came mainly from Medway (30) and Canterbury (30), both in Kent. Around 20 new arrivals each came from Leicester, Nottingham, Milton Keynes, Brighton and Hove, Southampton and County Durham.

Mid Suffolk

Mid Suffolk encountered the region’s second largest overall net growth in terms of internal migration over the period.

With 5,570 new arrivals from the UK compared with 4,520 departures, the district gained a net total of 1,050 new residents.

Most came from the neighbouring districts of Ipswich (770), St Edmundsbury (700) and Suffolk Coastal (400). However there was also a significant number of people coming across the county line from South Norfolk (340) and Breckland (140).

Those from outside the region came mainly from Cornwall and Lincoln (30 each). Around 20 new arrivals each also came from Bristol, Reading, East Lindsey in Lincolnshire and South Northamptonshire.

Those leaving Mid Suffolk tended again to head to their neighbouring districts of St Edmundsbury (600), Ipswich (540) and Suffolk Coastal (450). Further afield, the most popular destinations among those departing were Scotland (60), East Riding in Yorkshire and Cornwall (both 30).

St Edmundsbury

St Edmundsbury was one of only two districts in the region to experience a net loss through internal migration over the period.

With 5,010 new arrivals from within the UK compared with 5,200 departures, the district saw an overall reduction of 190.

Most people leaving chose the nearby districts of Mid Suffolk (700), Forest Heath (350) and Babergh (300). However there was also a substantial westward move into the districts of South Cambridgeshire (230), East Cambridgeshire (120) and Cambridge (120).

Of those moving out of the wider region, most went to Scotland (100), followed by Wiltshire (50), York (40) and Lincoln (30).

The top three districts for where new arrivals came from mirrored exactly those most departed to – Mid Suffolk (600), Forest Heath (370) and Babergh (340). Those arriving from further afield, included people from Nottingham, Brighton and Hove, Wiltshire, Cornwall and Canterbury (all 20).

Suffolk Coastal

Suffolk Coastal’s internal migration links with Ipswich were the region’s strongest in both directions.

A total of 1,540 people moved from Ipswich to Suffolk Coastal compared with 1,270 moving the other way.

Neighbours Mid Suffolk (450) and Waveney (300) were the next most frequent districts of origin. They were also the second and third most common districts departed to, with 400 relocating to Mid Suffolk and 290 to Waveney.

Of those leaving East Anglia, Scotland (110) was the most popular destination, followed by Leeds (60).

Those arriving from outside the region came mainly from Nottingham, Medway, Wiltshire and Canterbury (all 30).

Overall, 6,070 people moved from within the UK to Suffolk Coastal compared with 5,280 departing, creating a net increase of 790.

Tendring

Tendring saw the region’s largest net internal migration with an overall growth of 1,700.

A total of 6,960 people moved into the district between 2013/14 compared with 5,260 who moved away over the same period.

Most of the new arrivals came from neighbouring districts in Essex: Colchester (1,250); Braintree (310) and Chelmsford (180).

From outside the East of England region, the largest number of new arrivals came from Medway in Kent (40) and Canterbury, also in Kent, (40) followed by Milton Keynes (30).

People leaving the district also tended to remain close by, with most moving to Colchester (1,210), followed by Babergh (280) and Ipswich (210).

Those leaving the region altogether headed mainly for Scotland (80) with significant numbers also relocating to the London boroughs of Newham (40) and Tower Hamlets (40).