Terminal extension reaches the heights

STANSTED Airport has capped its £40million terminal extension scheme with a major roofing exercise. The first of 22 “diagrids” or roof domes, weighing 30 tonnes each, were lowered into place by a team of specialist contractors, marking an important milestone for the project, which will create an extra 5,900sq m of floor space at the terminal.

STANSTED Airport has capped its £40million terminal extension scheme with a major roofing exercise.

The first of 22 “diagrids” or roof domes, weighing 30 tonnes each, were lowered into place by a team of specialist contractors, marking an important milestone for the project, which will create an extra 5,900sq m of floor space at the terminal.

Watson Structural Steel Ltd and MACE used a 450 tonne crane to place each diagrid, measuring 18m sq, onto the extension's unique steel structure to be secured, glazed and weatherproofed.

The domes are assembled at a dedicated construction zone at the airport before being carefully transferred to the main construction site.


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The extension will create extra space in the international arrivals area, with expanded immigration, baggage and customs halls due to open in June next year. The whole project is expected to be completed by December 2008.

BAA Stansted's project leader for the terminal extension Paul Chatten said they had already made “excellent” progress since the scheme got under way in April this year.

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“We have now reached one of the most significant stages of the development as we undertake a series of complex roof lifts - this is not your everyday roofing job,” he said.

Every evening, a safety exclusion zone of 75m in diameter is put in place around the crane while the lifts are carried out, and the project organisers are working closely with the terminal management team to keep disruption to a minimum, he said.

“We also have to factor in the weather conditions,” he said. “If wind speeds are in excess of 17mph we cannot carry out any lifts, so when working to a tight schedule, it's crucial we have the right conditions to carry out the work safely.

“Thankfully, we have had minimal disruption from the weather so the project remains firmly on track.”

n Low-cost airline Easyjet is shedding its casual dress in favour of a new, more formal look for its cabin crew.

The airline adopted an informal look when it launched in the 1990s but has now opted for a more upmarket image.

The first uniform, in 1995, comprised black jeans and orange polo tops with “I'm an easy crew member” emblazoned across the back. Subsequent changes smartened up the image with black trousers and orange shirts, but until now, the casual image has remained.

Easyjet launched an internal competition to design a new uniform after deciding to update its look, with cabin crew voting for their favourite out of three finalists. The winning look, called Formal and Fabulous, was created by three cabin crew, AnnMarie Cuffe of Liverpool and Joanne Todd and Kurt Wilson of Gatwick.

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