Call for cull on

By David GreenAGGRESSIVE gulls are causing a nuisance in a seaside town and there is a case for a “concentrated cull”, a resident has claimed.Dick Bizzey, who lives in Aldeburgh, was responding to a report in yesterday's East Anglian Daily Times about gull attacks on humans reported in other parts of the country.

By David Green

AGGRESSIVE gulls are causing a nuisance in a seaside town and there is a case for a “concentrated cull”, a resident has claimed.

Dick Bizzey, who lives in Aldeburgh, was responding to a report in yesterday's East Anglian Daily Times about gull attacks on humans reported in other parts of the country.

As revealed in the EADT, a West Country ornithologist, who has made a special study of gulls, was predicting a big rise in the birds' population, especially in counties such as Suffolk.


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Mr Bizzey said he was “incensed” by an RSPB claim that there had been no reports of gulls nesting in residential areas of East Anglia.

“There are several nests on chimney pots this year in my own road, others elsewhere in the town and during the previous two years we had one on our chimney pot,” he added.

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“Apart from the noise and the filthy excrement, we had a major problem when the chicks eventually flew from the nest into our garden.

“During this time it was dangerous to go out there. The parent gulls swooped at us and I ended up having to hold a stick over my head as protection.”

The gulls also split open and rooted around in refuse sacks put out for refuse collectors and left a trail of domestic waste.

Mr Bizzey, who put wire about his chimney pot this year to prevent nesting, said there was a case for a “concentrated cull” of common gulls, which he considered to be “aerial rodents”.

He added: “This need not be inhumane as the normal way to do this is to destroy the eggs before they are hatched.”

Michael Good, the Mayor of Aldeburgh, said he and other residents had often been woken up at dawn by the screeching of the gulls, but he was unaware of any complaints about attacks on humans.

RSPB spokesman, Steve Rowland, said it had not previously received reports of gulls nesting in residential areas in Suffolk.

He added it was preferable to try deterring the gulls from nesting in residential areas rather than culling them.

“They come into the town for the food which is left in the streets and this needs to be eliminated first,” said Mr Rowland.

david.green@eadt.co.uk

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