Cathedral work concerns voiced

BOSSES have defended themselves after concerns were voiced about the slow progress made on completing work at a famous Suffolk cathedral. It has emerged that St Edmundsbury Cathedral is only employing three workmen on the remaining tasks, which include jobs in the chapels and the cloisters.

BOSSES have defended themselves after concerns were voiced about the slow progress made on completing work at a famous Suffolk cathedral.

It has emerged that St Edmundsbury Cathedral is only employing three workmen on the remaining tasks, which include jobs in the chapels and the cloisters.

The news comes almost two years after the completed Bury St Edmunds tower was officially opened by Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall in July 2005.

The Prince has shown a keen interest in the key stages of the build, which has championed traditional craftsmanship.


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But, despite the fanfare, work close to the Millennium tower is still far from complete with rubble and scaffolding in plain sight - apparently unchanged since the royal visit.

Simon Pott, chairman of the Bury Society, said: “Cathedral officials should tell us the time for completion. I am concerned this area in the heart of the town is not finished.

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“It has received a huge amount of publicity and it needs to be treated appropriately because at the moment we have a situation where people have come to see the astonishing tower and to one side there is a muddle.

“I don't know what the delay is - I have asked the cathedral and they say it is being done but there doesn't seem to be any progress.

“I'm anxious for them - I want them to complete what is one of the most astonishing projects either here in Suffolk or anywhere in the country.”

A spokeswoman for the cathedral said the tower and the cloister areas were different projects which have received different treatment from a considerably smaller work force.

She said the work was complex and exacting and was always going to be a slow process.

She added: “We are looking forward to having it back to normal but we can't give a date.

“The expectation is that it will be done this year. But as with the tower it is all done to the highest standards and the architect wants to make sure it is done right.

“For example we can't finish the cloisters until the chapels are finished so the floors aren't damaged. “And the numbers of people working permanently on site are considerably reduced as well.”

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