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Colin Caffell speaks about dealing with ‘trauma’ of Jeremy Bamber White House Farm murders

PUBLISHED: 07:00 25 January 2020 | UPDATED: 13:44 28 January 2020

Colin Caffell, 66, has spoken out over the White House Farm case Picture: ITV

Colin Caffell, 66, has spoken out over the White House Farm case Picture: ITV

ITV

The man whose twin boys and ex-wife were murdered at a farmhouse in Essex in 1985 has opened up about how he managed to rebuild his life following the tragedy.

Actor Mark Stanley plays Colin Caffell in the White House Farm ITV drama Picture: ITVActor Mark Stanley plays Colin Caffell in the White House Farm ITV drama Picture: ITV

Colin Caffell has had to live under the cloud of the tragic events at White House Farm, Tolleshunt D'Arcy, near Maldon, for nearly 35 years.

During the night of August 6/7, 1985, his twin six-year-old sons Daniel and Nicholas were shot alongside his ex-wife Sheila 'Bambi' Caffell and her parents Nevill and June Bamber.

The man responsible for the five murders, then 24-year-old Jeremy Bamber, was the boys' uncle.

Bamber attempted to frame his sister Sheila, who had mental health issues, for the killings in a murder/suicide but was eventually convicted by a jury at Chelmsford Crown Court in October 1986.

Jeremy Bamber arrives at the Court of Appeal in London in 2002 Picture: PAJeremy Bamber arrives at the Court of Appeal in London in 2002 Picture: PA

Bamber, who is serving a whole-life tariff at Wakefield prison, has always maintained his innocence.

MORE: Jeremy Bamber brands ITV drama 'a disgrace'

In 1994, Colin wrote a book on his experiences of the case entitled In Search of the Rainbow's End - which producers used alongside Carol Ann Lee's book The Murders at White House Farm to create a new ITV drama of the events.

Colin, now 66, explains how he was able to move on.

"I've known and seen many families who have been through a trauma like this and they are destroying themselves," he said.

Jeremy Bamber and girlfriend Julie Mugford at the funeral of three members of his family a year before he was convicted of their murders Picture: PAJeremy Bamber and girlfriend Julie Mugford at the funeral of three members of his family a year before he was convicted of their murders Picture: PA

"Being eaten away inside by the hatred. It's so sad. I wasn't going to let that happen to me.

"There is a glimpse of that journey in this drama at the twins' funeral where I asked people to wear bright colours and celebrate Nicholas and Daniel's lives."

MORE: What is the chilling true story of the White House Farm murders?

A shocked Colin said he had no reason to suspect Bamber had been involved when news of the murders first emerged.

"Jeremy is a very charming and scary person. Initially, I was very much set up to be on Jeremy's side, then realising that complete betrayal. It was devastating," he said.

White House Farm started on January 8 on ITV Picture: ITVWhite House Farm started on January 8 on ITV Picture: ITV

"Initially, I was fed limited information about what had actually happened. I was also stopping people telling me things because I was trying to retain some semblance of happy images.

"Once people explained the circumstances to me I said, 'Sheila couldn't have done that.' She had never picked up a rifle in her life and certainly never knew how to fire one or re-load one."

MORE: 'My personal opinion is very much that he's guilty' - author Carol Ann Lee

Colin added Sheila was a "kind and loving" mother to the twins.

"Sheila was a passionate young woman, hungry for loving affirmation, but with no real concept of how beautiful she actually was," he said.

"Before she was diagnosed and medicated she could be explosive as a way of dealing with her frustration. But she was only ever destructive towards inanimate objects, breaking things in order to cause a reaction in others, usually me.

"As a mother to the twins, she was always kind and loving, playful, like a lioness with her cubs, never ever angry with them."

The fourth episode of White House Farm continues on ITV at 9pm on Wednesday, January 29 at 9pm.


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